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Saturday

11:00 AM – 5:00 PM EDT

Interventions to Support Children with Developmental Language Disorder

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Developmental Language Disorder (DLD) is a persistent language problem with a significant impact on everyday social interactions or educational progress. In this workshop, we’ll briefly review the criteria and characteristics of DLD, but we’ll spend the majority of the session talking about intervention. We’ll discuss classroom strategies, small group supports, and individual therapies, primarily in the context of school-aged children although the information will be relevant to other ages as well. We’ll also think about intervention design, monitoring outcomes and options for intensifying intervention when needed. This will be an interactive session with ample time for questions and discussion.

Learning objectives:

  • Understand the criteria and characteristics of Developmental Language Disorder
  • Know evidence-based intervention options for children with DLD
  • Have strategies for monitoring and modifying intervention as needed
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

School Aged (5-17)

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM EDT

Assessing Entry-To-Practice: The New Canadian Assessment of Clinical Competence (ACC-SLP/AUD)

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Susan J Wagner, B.Sc. (SPA), M.Sc. (CD), Reg. CASLPO, S-LP(C), University of Toronto; Lu-Anne McFarlane, M.Sc., University of Alberta; Justine Hamilton, M.Cl.Sc., Reg. CASLPO, M.B.A., McMaster University; Lynn Ellwood, B.Sc. (CD), M.H.Sc., Reg. CASLPO, SLP(C), M.B.A., University of Toronto; The Canadian Academic Coordinators/Directors of Clinical Education.

Objectively assessing clinical competence is essential to the quality of speech-language pathology and audiology services. Consequently, regulators, professional associations, accreditors, educational programs, learners, faculty and clinicians are integrating national competency profiles into their systems. Following an overview of key features and concepts related to competency-based education and assessment, this mini-seminar introduces the new Canadian Assessment of Clinical Competence (ACC-SLP/AUD). This national clinical education assessment tool, including milestones or developmental stages of a specific competence, will be explored through student scenarios. Participants will apply competency-based assessment principles using examples from the tool to enable application to their own contexts.

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

11:00 AM – 2:30 PM EDT

Biliteracy Instruction in French Immersion

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

The recording for this live session will be available for viewing until May 27, 2022 only.

The target for this session is school S-LPs seeking to coach teachers to implement evidence-based reading support in the classroom.

Structured instruction in phonological awareness, phoneme-grapheme correspondences, spelling rules and morphological awareness is critical for literacy success (NRP, 2000, Bowers, Kirby & Deacon, 2010). Students enrolled in dual language French immersion programs require this in both English and French, with careful consideration of the relationship between elements of each language (Ballinger, Lyster, Sterzuk & Genesee, 2017). This workshop will map out in detail many proposed evidence-informed scopes and sequences for English and French literacy instruction from Kindergarten to grade 6 and beyond. We will cover the what, why and how of phonological awareness, phoneme-grapheme correspondences, spelling rules, and morphological awareness for classroom instruction. Throughout, opportunities to foster bidirectional transfer across English and French will be highlighted.

Learning objectives:

  • Gain familiarity with robust research evidence pertaining to critical elements of literacy instruction
  • Identify and understand the components and developmental sequence of literacy instruction in English and French
  • Identify key similarities and differences in English versus French phonological awareness, phoneme-grapheme correspondences, spelling rules, and morphological awareness
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

School Aged (5-17)

11:00 AM – 2:30 PM EDT

Inferencing in Narratives

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

This session will be presented live only and will not be recorded for viewing at a later date.

Inferential comprehension is a fundamental ability for the development of social competence, oral language, and reading abilities of children. Moreover, inferencing skills are known to be critical to comprehension across both oral and written contexts and enable the construction of coherent and complete mental representation of messages. This presentation will cover (a) an overview of inferential comprehension development in narratives, (b) inferential comprehension difficulties in young populations (e.g. children with developmental language disorders (DLD), children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), children exposed to neglect), and (c) explore evidence-based interventions in order to foster inferential comprehension in narratives. In this presentation, S-LPs will be invited to reflect about both aspects of assessment and intervention of inferencing in narratives.

Learning objectives:

  • Understand key elements of inferential comprehension development in children aged 6 years and under
  • Explore different assessment tasks that can be used to assess inferencing in narratives
  • Identify potential inferential comprehension difficulties in young populations
  • Reflect on evidence-based interventions in order to foster inferential comprehension in narratives
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

11:00 AM – 1:30 PM EDT

The S-LP’s Role in Long-Term Care: How Can We Create a Clinical Pathway?

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

This session will be presented live only and will not be recorded for viewing at a later date.

Older adults residing in long-term care present with several health challenges – many of which are inextricably linked to dysphagia. Unfortunately, speech-language pathologists are under-utilized in this setting. As such, we need to take an interdisciplinary approach to care to ensure the appropriate referrals are made and resident needs are met. In addition to empowering clinicians to advocate for increased S-LP services in long-term care by outlining a potential care pathway, this session will focus on many of the factors that need to be addressed when we are asked to see residents of long-term care. We will discuss presbyphagia, determining swallowing pathophysiology, feasible intervention options and nutrition. Best practices for screening, assessing, and treating dysphagia will also be covered. Ultimately, attendees will walk away from the session with the information required to advocate for increased S-LP services in long term care, as well as increased knowledge of how to assess and treat dysphagia given the current restrictions imposed on Canadian S-LPs working in long-term care.

Learning objectives:

  • Describe the importance of integrating S-LPs into long-term care settings.
  • Identify two ways S-LPs can help to create a clinical pathway for dysphagia referrals in long-term care.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists

Age Group(s)

Senior (65+)

12:30 PM – 1:00 PM EDT

Break

Sponsored by:

1:00 PM – 2:30 PM EDT

Being and Becoming, Together: A Conversation Between Two Indigenous Early-Learning Professionals and a Pediatric S-LP

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

This session will be presented live only and will not be recorded for viewing at a later date.

Authors:

Janine L. Chesworth, S-LP(C), R-SLP, Doctoral student, Special Education, Educational Psychology, Kehewin Cree Nation/University of Alberta; Elissa Gadwa, Jordan's Principle Program Coordinator, Kehewin Cree Nation; Melissa Paul, Cree Language Teacher, Kehewin Cree Nation

Indigenous communities are gaining increased access to S-LP. Many challenges and critical issues are coming to light at the intersection of these two distinctly different worlds. This discussion amongst two nehiyaw early-learning professionals and one non-Indigenous S-LP explores the experiences of being on the precarious landscape of language revitalization and cultural reclamation in an Indigenous community, moving forward despite systemic confines inherent to health and education. What will be shared? What has evolved in our ongoing process of Indigenizing S-LP practice, and what we are becoming together.

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

1:00 PM – 1:45 PM EDT

Culturally Relevant Assessment for American Sign Language Development

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Author: Charlotte J Enns, PhD, University of Manitoba.

Increasing diversity in the cultural and linguistic backgrounds of deaf children in Canada challenges traditional monolingual approaches to language testing. There is a need to balance the numerous measures available to assess spoken languages with the scarcity of measures to assess signed languages. In this presentation, the development of two standardized tests of American Sign Language (ASL) for use in research and education with children aged 3 – 13 years will be described: 1) the ASL Receptive Skills Test and 2) The ASL Expressive Skills Test. The content, format, procedures, and psychometrics of each of the tests will be outlined.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

School Aged (5-17)

1:50 PM – 2:35 PM EDT

Readiness Support: Promoting Attendance and Engagement in Children's Services

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors: Michelle Phoenix; Gillian King; Sue Simpson; Maya Albin

Missed appointments are a common problem in children’s rehabilitation that may lead to client discharge and limit child outcomes. In this case study, we created, implemented and evaluated the “Readiness Support Program” to help families attend appointments and engage in services. This program includes a clinical care-path implemented by professionals (e.g., speech-language pathologists, social workers). Clinical scripts and centre policies were developed to help identify barriers to service use and devise solutions with families. Statistics, health records, interviews and a measurement tool were used to evaluate the implementation of RSP, barriers to service use, outcome of RSP and recommend changes.

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

2:30 PM – 3:00 PM EDT

Break

Sponsored by:

3:00 PM – 5:00 PM EDT

Planting Two Trees with One Seed: AAC Supports for Challenging Behavior

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

This presentation will introduce evidence-based AAC supports for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or other developmental disabilities who engage in challenging behaviour. Strategies will include functional communication training and choice-making supports.

Learning objectives:

  • Explain the relationship between communication and problem behavior
  • Describe four essential elements of functional communication training (FCT)
  • Describe the use of contingency maps as an adjunct to FCT
  • Give an example of the use of AAC for choice-making as a solution for problem behaviour
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64)

3:00 PM – 5:00 PM EDT

Selective Mutism: Practical Strategies for S-LPs

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

The recording for this live session will be available for viewing until May 16, 2022 only.

Selective Mutism is an anxiety disorder affecting approximately 1% of children, with huge effects on their social, emotional, and academic lives. Recent research supports the use of behaviourally-based therapies including techniques such as shaping and fading (e.g., Bergman et al., 2013; Catchpole et al., 2019, Cornacchio et al., 2019). For treatment to be effective, good coordination between school professionals, treating professionals, and parents is needed. Speech-language pathologists are ideally placed to help inform educational professionals about evidence-based treatment and are well qualified to deliver the treatment itself (time permitting). In this practical, engaging workshop, the following will be discussed:

  • an overview of Selective Mutism including comorbidities relevant to S-LPs
  • current evidence-based best practices in assessment and treatment of Selective Mutism
  • a brief overview of treatment components including warm up, encouraging speech, and fading in
  • best practices for coordinating with other team members
  • general 'tips and tricks' from a seasoned practitioner
  • an overview of resources that can be shared with educators and parents alike

The didactic portion of the workshop will be 90 minutes, followed by 30 minutes of “Q&A style” discussion. This workshop will be relevant to S-LPs working in school settings as well as those in private practice.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

3:00 PM – 4:30 PM EDT

The Speech-Language Pathologist (S-LP) Role in Medical Assistance in Dying

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

In June 2016, Canada legalized medical assistance in dying (MAID) as a right and set legal requirements around patient consent and participation. In March 2021 there were amendments to the law and safeguards put into place which allowed access to an assisted death for a broader client population. For patients with communication disorders who lack communication support, access to this right and the ability to fully consent can be limited. At the same time, despite the role of Speech-Language Pathologists (S-LPs) in providing communication supports at end-of-life, there continues to be almost no research or practice guidance around S-LP participation in MAID and limited awareness of the benefits of S-LP contributions to MAID.

Learning objectives:

  • Address the unique role of S-LPs in the MAID process by combining clinical insight from S-LP participation on interdisciplinary MAID teams since 2016 with S-LP best practices on capacity to consent in end-of-life conversations.
  • Address gaps in client care by outlining the S-LP role in MAID, sharing clinical experiences, case studies and practical resources in order for S-LPs to feel more prepared to support a client’s communication during the MAID process.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

3:00 PM – 4:30 PM EDT

The Usefulness in Use-ful-ness: Clinical Application of Identifying Inflection, Derivation and Compounding in Language Samples

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Author: Dr. Bonita Squires, University of British Columbia, Dalhousie University

Advanced academic vocabulary is largely made up of multi-morphemic words such as geographical, inequality and expressionism. To assess and intervene on vocabulary development, clinicians may consider identifying multi-morphemic words and morphemes that children already produce in language samples.

Learning objectives:

  • Learn about language sampling and the development of different types of morphology.
  • Practice the systematic identification of multi-morphemic words in a real language sample produced by a child who is deaf or hard-of-hearing.
  • Brainstorm ways to use this information in setting goals and developing stimuli for intervention.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

School Aged (5-17)

3:00 PM – 3:45 PM EDT

What Do People with Parkinson’s Disease Gain from Watching Educational Videos on Communication and Swallowing?

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Marie-Christine Hallé, PhD, École d’orthophonie et d’audiologie, Université de Montréal et CRIR; Ons El Mokhtar, École d’orthophonie et d’audiologie, Université de Montréal et CRIR; Sinead Creagh, Human Communication, Development, and Information Sciences, Faculty of Education, The University of Hong Kong; Édith Coulombe, École d’orthophonie et d’audiologie, Université de Montréal et CRIR; Charline Delorme, École d’orthophonie et d’audiologie, Université de Montréal et CRIR; Ingrid Verduyckt, PhD, École d’orthophonie et d’audiologie, Université de Montréal et CRIR.

Considering the limited access to speech-language therapy services for people with Parkinson’s Disease (PwPD), online educational videos addressing speech and swallowing symptoms and self-management strategies may benefit this patient population. Aiming to evaluate the impact and appreciation of such videos, we invited PwPD to complete an online survey one week before, immediately after, and two-months after watching an educational video on communication or swallowing. Results from the comparison of respondents’ level of knowledge and confidence in self-managing their symptoms at each time point will be presented along with the results from our qualitative analysis of respondents’ impression of the videos.

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

3:50 PM – 4:35 PM EDT

The Prevalence of Dysphagia: Results from the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Rebecca Affoo, PhD, CCC-SLP, SLP-Reg, S-LP(C), Dalhousie University; Bonnie Lam, BSc, McMaster University; Jinhui Ma, PhD, McMaster University; Ashwini Namasivayam-MacDonald, PhD, S-LP(C), CCC-SLP, Reg. CASLPO, McMaster University.

This session will focus on describing results from a secondary cross-sectional analysis of Canadian population-based data to highlight the prevalence of dysphagia in community-dwelling older adults aged 45 years and older at baseline, and then at follow-up approximately three years later. Prevalence of dysphagia will be examined across provinces and key demographic characteristics such as age, sex, race, education, income, and location. The results will be compared with data from other countries. Implications for policy and practice will be discussed.

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)