Daily Schedule

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Saturday

8:00 AM – 3:00 PM

Interventions to Support Children with Developmental Language Disorder

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

Developmental Language Disorder (DLD) is a persistent language problem with a significant impact on everyday social interactions or educational progress. In this workshop, we’ll briefly review the criteria and characteristics of DLD, but we’ll spend the majority of the session talking about intervention. We’ll discuss classroom strategies, small group supports, and individual therapies, primarily in the context of school-aged children although the information will be relevant to other ages as well. We’ll also think about intervention design, monitoring outcomes and options for intensifying intervention when needed. This will be an interactive session with ample time for questions and discussion.

Learning objectives:

  • Understand the criteria and characteristics of Developmental Language Disorder
  • Know evidence-based intervention options for children with DLD
  • Have strategies for monitoring and modifying intervention as needed
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

School Aged (5-17)

8:00 AM – 11:15 AM

Biliteracy Instruction in French Immersion

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

The target for this session is school S-LPs seeking to coach teachers to implement evidence-based reading support in the classroom.

Structured instruction in phonological awareness, phoneme-grapheme correspondences, spelling rules and morphological awareness is critical for literacy success (NRP, 2000, Bowers, Kirby & Deacon, 2010). Students enrolled in dual language French immersion programs require this in both English and French, with careful consideration of the relationship between elements of each language (Ballinger, Lyster, Sterzuk & Genesee, 2017). This workshop will map out in detail many proposed evidence-informed scopes and sequences for English and French literacy instruction from Kindergarten to grade 6 and beyond. We will cover the what, why and how of phonological awareness, phoneme-grapheme correspondences, spelling rules, and morphological awareness for classroom instruction. Throughout, opportunities to foster bidirectional transfer across English and French will be highlighted.

Learning objectives:

  • Gain familiarity with robust research evidence pertaining to critical elements of literacy instruction
  • Identify and understand the components and developmental sequence of literacy instruction in English and French
  • Identify key similarities and differences in English versus French phonological awareness, phoneme-grapheme correspondences, spelling rules, and morphological awareness
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

School Aged (5-17)

8:00 AM – 11:15 AM

Inferencing in Narratives

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

Inferential comprehension is a fundamental ability for the development of social competence, oral language, and reading abilities of children. Moreover, inferencing skills are known to be critical to comprehension across both oral and written contexts and enable the construction of coherent and complete mental representation of messages. This presentation will cover (a) an overview of inferential comprehension development in narratives, (b) inferential comprehension difficulties in young populations (e.g. children with developmental language disorders (DLD), children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), children exposed to neglect), and (c) explore evidence-based interventions in order to foster inferential comprehension in narratives. In this presentation, S-LPs will be invited to reflect about both aspects of assessment and intervention of inferencing in narratives.

Learning objectives:

  • Understand key elements of inferential comprehension development in children aged 6 years and under
  • Explore different assessment tasks that can be used to assess inferencing in narratives
  • Identify potential inferential comprehension difficulties in young populations
  • Reflect on evidence-based interventions in order to foster inferential comprehension in narratives
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

8:00 AM – 11:15 AM

The S-LP’s Role in Long-Term Care: How Can We Create a Clinical Pathway?

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

Older adults residing in long-term care present with several health challenges – many of which are inextricably linked to dysphagia. Unfortunately, speech-language pathologists are under-utilized in this setting. As such, we need to take an interdisciplinary approach to care to ensure the appropriate referrals are made and resident needs are met. In addition to empowering clinicians to advocate for increased S-LP services in long-term care by outlining a potential care pathway, this session will focus on many of the factors that need to be addressed when we are asked to see residents of long-term care. We will discuss presbyphagia, determining swallowing pathophysiology, feasible intervention options and nutrition. Best practices for screening, assessing, and treating dysphagia will also be covered. Ultimately, attendees will walk away from the session with the information required to advocate for increased S-LP services in long term care, as well as increased knowledge of how to assess and treat dysphagia given the current restrictions imposed on Canadian S-LPs working in long-term care.

Learning objectives:

  • Describe the importance of integrating S-LPs into long-term care settings.
  • Identify two ways S-LPs can help to create a clinical pathway for dysphagia referrals in long-term care.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists

9:30 AM – 9:45 AM

Morning Break

Join us for refreshments.

12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

Lunch

Join us for lunch.

1:00 PM – 3:00 PM

Planting Two Trees with One Seed: AAC Supports for Challenging Behavior

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

This presentation will introduce evidence-based AAC supports for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or other developmental disabilities who engage in challenging behaviour. Strategies will include functional communication training and choice-making supports.

Learning objectives:

  • Explain the relationship between communication and problem behavior
  • Describe four essential elements of functional communication training (FCT)
  • Describe the use of contingency maps as an adjunct to FCT
  • Give an example of the use of AAC for choice-making as a solution for problem behaviour
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64)

1:00 PM – 3:00 PM

Selective Mutism: How to Identify and Treat!

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

Selective Mutism is a rare disorder affecting 1% of children. In this presentation, we will review how to identify this disorder, its etiology and longitudinal course, and current evidence based treatment recommendations to help children struggling with Selective Mutism. This presentation will include some hands on practice opportunities for participants as well as resources to best support families.

Learning objectives:

  • How to identify Selective Mutism and its causes.
  • How to treat Selective Mutism in the community.
  • When to seek specialized help and what resources are out there.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

1:00 PM – 3:00 PM

The Speech-Language Pathologist (S-LP) Role in Medical Assistance in Dying

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

In June 2016, Canada legalized medical assistance in dying (MAID) as a right and set legal requirements around patient consent and participation. In March 2021 there were amendments to the law and safeguards put into place which allowed access to an assisted death for a broader client population. For patients with communication disorders who lack communication support, access to this right and the ability to fully consent can be limited. At the same time, despite the role of Speech-Language Pathologists (S-LPs) in providing communication supports at end-of-life, there continues to be almost no research or practice guidance around S-LP participation in MAID and limited awareness of the benefits of S-LP contributions to MAID.

Learning objectives:

  • Address the unique role of S-LPs in the MAID process by combining clinical insight from S-LP participation on interdisciplinary MAID teams since 2016 with S-LP best practices on capacity to consent in end-of-life conversations.
  • Address gaps in client care by outlining the S-LP role in MAID, sharing clinical experiences, case studies and practical resources in order for S-LPs to feel more prepared to support a client’s communication during the MAID process.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)