Daily Schedule

Search Sessions
Age Group

Friday

6:45 AM – 7:30 AM

SAC Run/Walk

Start your day off right with a refreshing walk or run with your colleagues. Enjoy Vancouver’s beautiful scenic views before you begin day two of the conference.

8:30 AM – 12:00 PM

An Update on Evidence-Based Interventions for Acquired Language Disorders Across the Continuum of Care

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

Following a brief overview of contemporary conceptualizations of aphasia and other acquired language disorders and their management in a variety of healthcare settings, this presentation will critically review recently developed interventions designed to: (a) directly remediate acquired language disorders, common, concomitant extra-linguistic issues, or both, and (b) via compensatory approaches (e.g., communication partner training), indirectly address acquired language disorders, related concomitant impairments, or both.

Learning objectives:

  • Participants will be able to describe recently developed therapy procedures designed to directly address and remediate the linguistic and related concomitant symptoms of adults with aphasia or other acquired language disorders.
  • Participants will be able to describe recently developed therapy procedures designed to compensate for or indirectly address the linguistic and related concomitant symptoms of adults with aphasia or other acquired language disorders.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

8:30 AM – 12:00 PM

Bilingual Children with Developmental Disorders on the Yellow Brick Road: Brain, Heart and Courage

The language used in the descriptions reflects the language of the sessions.

The majority of the population in Canada is at least bilingual, and a significant proportion of children grow up speaking more than one language. However, when many of these children struggle with literacy and academic tasks in schools, it is often difficult for S-LPs to establish the degree to which these difficulties are associated, if at all, with the child’s language abilities. This presentation will discuss the most recent research-based recommendations for assessment of bilingual children, and will provide guiding principles on how to support pre-school and school-aged bilingual children who are neurodivergent or have language or cognitive delays

Learning objectives:

  • Describe differences between language delay vs. lack of language proficiency,
  • Identify additional difficulties that neurodivergent children who are bilingual experience in schools and why
  • Explain how oral languages is fundamental to literacy development
  • List some main approaches to assessment and intervention of bilingual children.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

8:30 AM – 12:00 PM

The Role of the Speech-Language Pathologist on a FASD Diagnostic Team

The language used in the descriptions reflects the language of the sessions.

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is the leading non-genetic cause of developmental disability in Canada. The Manitoba FASD Centre in Winnipeg has been providing assessments for children and youth prenatally exposed to alcohol for over two decades. It typically receives over 400 referrals a year from across the province. The Manitoba FASD Centre follows the Canadian FASD Diagnostic Guidelines (2015) as a framework for the diagnostic process. The Guidelines outline 10 areas of brain domain functioning as part of the neurodevelopmental assessment of FASD. A multidisciplinary team approach, which includes a speech-language pathologist (S-LP), is strongly recommended due to the complexity of the disorder. Challenges in the diagnostic process as well as trends in the assessment findings relating to domains of brain functioning will be discussed. Team collaboration in the development of concrete and practical intervention strategies that highlight the client’s strengths and weaknesses, will also be outlined.

The objectives of this presentation are to discuss:

  • Influences contributing to maternal alcohol consumption
  • Maternal risk factors associated with FASD
  • The Canadian FASD Diagnostic Guidelines (2015)
  • Barriers to the assessment process
  • Role of the S-LP on a FASD diagnostic team
  • The recommended speech and language assessment tools when querying FASD
  • The neurodevelopmental profile of individuals with FASD
  • Intervention strategies for individuals with FASD
  • Past and present speech and language research
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

10:00 AM – 10:30 AM

Morning Break

Join us for refreshments on the trade show floor and meet with the exhibitors.

12:00 PM – 1:30 PM

Lunch in Exhibit Hall

Join us for lunch on the trade show floor and meet with the exhibitors.

1:30 PM – 5:00 PM

Accessing It All: AAC Options for All Learners

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

Deciding what communication system to trial with a client can be a very overwhelming process. Frequent questions such as paper-based or high tech? Dedicated or iPad? If dedicated, what system? If iPad, what app? are asked on a regular basis. The questions are almost endless as clinicians attempt to match specific features with specific clients. Now what happens if the client in question is not a direct selector or requires modifications to access a robust communication system? What options are then available?

A bulk of this presentation will be dedicated towards the different types of access methods that may be required for a clinician to support their client. Participants will look at both technology-based solutions and partner-based solutions for their clients. Switch access, joystick use, eye-gaze, and head tracking/pointing will be discussed as viable means of access for complex communicators. Participants will see examples and videos of individuals accessing AAC via these methods. Given the ever-evolving nature of technology, participants will look to the future to see what is on the horizon for working with complex communicators and how technology makes accessing communication easier. It is important to note that technology is not always available, required, or a best fit. In these cases, clinicians may need to investigate how to use a robust communication system with parent-assisted scanning or eye-gaze.

Accessibility doesn’t just end at direct vs. indirect access. We must think about our clients’ vision. How can we make sure that their robust system is visually accessible? And if visual accessibility is not possible, or preferred, what can we do to create a tactile-accessible communication system? We will look at available options for both categories, as well as how we can customize what is already in place to help accessibility.

Participants will learn why it is important to look at clients from a holistic perspective, and why they need to consider multi-modal communication when implementing any form of communication with their clients.

Finally, participants will work together with the presenter to brainstorm next steps for their clients. The “WHAT” after you begin implementing an AAC system is always a big question from clinicians. But there is an extra layer required when considering AAC users who may have some accessibility concerns.

Learning objectives:

  • Describe the differences in how direct and in-direct selectors access AAC.
  • Identify at least five different accommodations available when pure direct selection is not ideal for an AAC user.
  • Discuss three ways to incorporate AAC use into your clients everyday environment while dynamically assessing accessibility needs.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

1:30 PM – 5:00 PM

Intervention for Bilingual and Multilingual Children

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

The basic principles of language intervention are the same for monolingual and bilingual children: children need activities that are motivating, that advance their language and that help them communicate more efficiently. However, for multilingual children, many questions arise, notably which language(s) to focus on in therapy, whether to prioritize one language over another, whether to work on the same linguistic structures in both languages, whether treatment gains transfer from one language to the other, how to motivate bilingual children and their families, and how to maximally support the child’s learning in the short and long run.

This lecture will:

  • survey answers to these questions from the research literature and point to concrete ways in which therapy could be planned following the current state of the art.
  • present new research data on an international treatment efficacy study, and international parent interview study and on longitudinal data on the language development of immigrant children in Montreal to present the process of becoming bilingual from the viewpoint of children and their parents.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

1:30 PM – 5:00 PM

Traumatic Brain Injury and Vulnerable Populations; An Important Role for Speech-Language Pathology

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is highly prevalent among vulnerable and underserved populations such as those in the criminal justice system, and those who are homeless or unstably housed. In fact, the prevalence of TBI among these populations is a serious public health issue. Not surprisingly, a history of TBI (diagnosed or suspected) precedes their experience of criminal involvement and or homelessness for many. More recently, there is increased awareness of TBI among women survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV). Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, statistics showed that 1 in 4 women would experience IPV in their life-time, however throughout the pandemic, this has increased to 1 in 3. The majority of these individuals have not had access to proper diagnosis, care and rehabilitation.

The communication challenges associated with TBI including cognitive-communication disorders and social communication disorders are often superimposed upon pre-existing language and literacy issues for some of these individuals. Moreover, these communication disorders negatively impact outcomes and community reintegration and can be a factor in recidivism for those who are justice involved.

Speech-language pathologists can play an important role in mitigating these challenges through direct intervention as well as through training of front-line staff.

This presentation will provide opportunities for learning through didactic lecture, video, as well as discussion and audience small group activities.

Learning objectives:

  • Understand the prevalence of traumatic brain injury among vulnerable populations
  • Understand the intersection of psychological trauma in concert with physical and brain trauma
  • Identify the cognitive-communication and social communication impairments that contribute to vulnerability
  • Understand the role of speech-language pathology in assessing and treating these individuals
  • Learn specific strategies and techniques to support these individuals
  • Understand the value and importance of education and training of front-line staff
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

Adult (18-64)

3:00 PM – 3:30 PM

Afternoon Break

Join us for refreshments on the trade show floor and meet with the exhibitors.

6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Social Event

Information coming soon