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Friday

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM EDT

An Update on Evidence-Based Interventions for Acquired Language Disorders Across the Continuum of Care

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Following a brief overview of contemporary conceptualizations of aphasia and other acquired language disorders and their management in a variety of healthcare settings, this presentation will critically review recently developed interventions designed to: (a) directly remediate acquired language disorders, common, concomitant extra-linguistic issues, or both, and (b) via compensatory approaches (e.g., communication partner training), indirectly address acquired language disorders, related concomitant impairments, or both.

Learning objectives:

  • Participants will be able to describe recently developed therapy procedures designed to directly address and remediate the linguistic and related concomitant symptoms of adults with aphasia or other acquired language disorders.
  • Participants will be able to describe recently developed therapy procedures designed to compensate for or indirectly address the linguistic and related concomitant symptoms of adults with aphasia or other acquired language disorders.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

11:00 AM – 2:30 PM EDT

Bilingual Children with Developmental Disorders on the Yellow Brick Road: Brain, Heart and Courage

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

The majority of the population in Canada is at least bilingual, and a significant proportion of children grow up speaking more than one language. However, when many of these children struggle with literacy and academic tasks in schools, it is often difficult for S-LPs to establish the degree to which these difficulties are associated, if at all, with the child’s language abilities. This presentation will discuss the most recent research-based recommendations for assessment of bilingual children, and will provide guiding principles on how to support pre-school and school-aged bilingual children who are neurodivergent or have language or cognitive delays

Learning objectives:

  • Describe differences between language delay vs. lack of language proficiency,
  • Identify additional difficulties that neurodivergent children who are bilingual experience in schools and why
  • Explain how oral languages is fundamental to literacy development
  • List some main approaches to assessment and intervention of bilingual children.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM EDT

Cultural Competence: Providing Inclusive Services to the LGBTQ+ Population

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

The recording for this live session will be available for viewing until May 27, 2022 only.

Authors:

Vincent Bourassa Bédard, MPO, PhD Candidate, Université de Montréal; Geneviève Meloni, MSc, PhD Candidate, Université de Montréal; Emma St-Laurent-Roberge, MPO, Centre de services scolaires Marie-Victorin.

Speech-Language & Audiology Canada’s (SAC, 2016) Code of Ethics states that its members should demonstrate acceptance toward their patients regardless of their sexual orientation or gender. However, recent studies in speech-language pathology show that most clinicians are not knowledgeable enough about LGBTQ+ issues. This issue leads to inequities in service access, meaning that the LGBTQ+ community do not always seek the needed care because of past negative experiences or fear of homophobic/transphobic comments. Through case studies, this workshop is specifically designed for all S-LPs so they can feel better equipped to provide inclusive services for all clients.

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM EDT

From Research to Practice: A Pivotal Response Treatment Group for Caregivers of Children with ASD

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Angele Fournier, M.Sc., R.SLP, S-LP(C), CASLPO, The Centre for Autism Services Alberta; Sally-Joy Nandee, R.SLP, S-LP(C), BCBA, The Centre for Autism Services Alberta; Michael Stolte, PhD (Special Education), C.C.C., R. Psych, The Centre for Autism Services Alberta.

We developed a community-based Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) group program for caregivers of autistic children. Caregivers were coached on the PRT motivational procedures for teaching first words. Outcome data was collected on caregiver fidelity of implementation, child functional verbal utterances, and caregivers completed qualitative questionnaires about the treatment. Results are summarized and suggest positive gains for both caregivers and their autistic children after participation in the program. Results also show that most caregivers liked the PRT procedures and felt they would lead to permanent improvements in their child’s communication.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

12:30 PM – 1:00 PM EDT

Break

Sponsored by:

1:00 PM – 1:45 PM EDT

Bilingualism, Narrative, Social and Pragmatic Skills in Children on the Autism Spectrum

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Myriam L. H. Beauchamp, M.S. SLP, PhD, McGill University; Stefano Rezzonico, PhD, Université de Montréal; Mayada Elsabbagh, PhD, McGill University; Eric Duku, PhD, McMaster University; Peter Szatmari, PhD, Centre for Addition and Mental Health, University of Toronto, The Hospital for Sick Children; Isabel Smith, PhD, Dalhousie University and Isaak Walton Killam Children’s Hospital; Connor Kerns, PhD, University of British Columbia; Lonnie Zwaigenbaum, PhD, University of Alberta; Patricia Mirenda, PhD, University of British Columbia; Terry Bennett, PhD, McMaster University.

Narrative skills are important for effective communication and academic achievement. However, difficulties with narratives are often reported in children on the autism spectrum (AS), and may stem from challenges with social and pragmatic skills. On the other hand, bilingual children on the AS may present stronger social skill when compared to their monolingual peers.

The current study compares the narrative, social and pragmatic skills of bilingual and monolingual school-aged children on the AS, and the relationship between these variables. The clinical implications of the findings from this study are also discussed.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

School Aged (5-17)

1:00 PM – 2:30 PM EDT

Discussion on the Impact of Systemic Racism in Speech-Language Pathology

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Laurence Charest, MScS, Centre de Services Scolaire de la Pointe-de-l'Île; Adalie Le Nguyen, MPO, Conseil Cri de la Santé et des Services Sociaux de la Baie James; Sandrine Umunoza, MScS, O(C), Cabinet d’orthophonie l’Envol.

This conference will discuss the impacts of direct and systemic racism in speech-language pathology through the presentation of the report from the Antiracism Action Group in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology. This report is based on studies in speech-language pathology, health science, reports from Statistics Canada and testimonials from speech-language pathologists (S-LP), as well as S-LP and audiology students studying in Québec. We will also offer action points and recommendations for our community to implement inclusive practices to validate ethnocultural differences. Attendees will learn how to become better allies, whether they work in universities, schools, health services or the private sector.

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

2:30 PM – 3:00 PM EDT

Break

Sponsored by:

3:00 PM – 6:30 PM EDT

Accessing It All: AAC Options for All Learners

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Deciding what communication system to trial with a client can be a very overwhelming process. Frequent questions such as paper-based or high tech? Dedicated or iPad? If dedicated, what system? If iPad, what app? are asked on a regular basis. The questions are almost endless as clinicians attempt to match specific features with specific clients. Now what happens if the client in question is not a direct selector or requires modifications to access a robust communication system? What options are then available?

A bulk of this presentation will be dedicated towards the different types of access methods that may be required for a clinician to support their client. Participants will look at both technology-based solutions and partner-based solutions for their clients. Switch access, joystick use, eye-gaze, and head tracking/pointing will be discussed as viable means of access for complex communicators. Participants will see examples and videos of individuals accessing AAC via these methods. Given the ever-evolving nature of technology, participants will look to the future to see what is on the horizon for working with complex communicators and how technology makes accessing communication easier. It is important to note that technology is not always available, required, or a best fit. In these cases, clinicians may need to investigate how to use a robust communication system with parent-assisted scanning or eye-gaze.

Accessibility doesn’t just end at direct vs. indirect access. We must think about our clients’ vision. How can we make sure that their robust system is visually accessible? And if visual accessibility is not possible, or preferred, what can we do to create a tactile-accessible communication system? We will look at available options for both categories, as well as how we can customize what is already in place to help accessibility.

Participants will learn why it is important to look at clients from a holistic perspective, and why they need to consider multi-modal communication when implementing any form of communication with their clients.

Finally, participants will work together with the presenter to brainstorm next steps for their clients. The “WHAT” after you begin implementing an AAC system is always a big question from clinicians. But there is an extra layer required when considering AAC users who may have some accessibility concerns.

Learning objectives:

  • Describe the differences in how direct and in-direct selectors access AAC.
  • Identify at least five different accommodations available when pure direct selection is not ideal for an AAC user.
  • Discuss three ways to incorporate AAC use into your clients everyday environment while dynamically assessing accessibility needs.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64)

3:00 PM – 5:30 PM EDT

Intervention for Bilingual and Multilingual Children

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

This session will be presented live only and will not be recorded for viewing at a later date.

The basic principles of language intervention are the same for monolingual and bilingual children: children need activities that are motivating, that advance their language and that help them communicate more efficiently. However, for multilingual children, many questions arise, notably which language(s) to focus on in therapy, whether to prioritize one language over another, whether to work on the same linguistic structures in both languages, whether treatment gains transfer from one language to the other, how to motivate bilingual children and their families, and how to maximally support the child’s learning in the short and long run.

This lecture will:

  • survey answers to these questions from the research literature and point to concrete ways in which therapy could be planned following the current state of the art.
  • present new research data on an international treatment efficacy study, and international parent interview study and on longitudinal data on the language development of immigrant children in Montreal to present the process of becoming bilingual from the viewpoint of children and their parents.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

3:00 PM – 3:45 PM EDT

Morphological Interventions Delivered by S-LPs and Educators for Kindergarten to Grade Three Students

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Basiliki Passaretti, MA, Reg. CASLPO, S-LP(C), McMaster University; Peter Cahill, MSc., Reg. CASLPO, S-LP(C), McMaster University; Annie Jiang, B.Sc., McMaster University; Tiffany Gallager, PhD, Brock University; Lyn Turkstra, PhD, McMaster University; Wenonah Campbell, PhD, McMaster University.

The ability to read is key to students’ academic success and well-developed morphological skills are an essential component of learning to read. Educators and S-LPs share the responsibility for effective literacy instruction with the combined expertise of the S-LP and educator ideal for language and literacy achievement. S-LP-educator collaboration may be a critical component of morphological interventions implemented in a classroom setting. A scoping review was conducted to describe morphological interventions and S-LP-educator collaborative practices with the specificity required to inform day-to-day practice. Data on the components of morphological interventions delivered in classrooms and S-LP-educator collaborative practices will be presented.

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

3:00 PM – 3:30 PM EDT

Tackling Social Inequalities in Language Development

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Author: Mélissa Di Sante, M.P.O (SLP), Ph.D, Université de Montréal/Centre de recherche en santé publique.

Social inequalities in language development opportunities exist among young children, in Canada as in most countries. Because of their expert knowledge of language development, speech-language pathologists should be involved in the discussions surrounding this important public health issue. This seminar aims to support speech-language pathologists who wish to act on these inequalities, by presenting key concepts and theories drawn from public health and health promotion, understanding how they relate to language development, and how they can guide actions and interventions conducted by speech-language pathologists to better support the language development of children in their communities.

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4)

3:00 PM – 6:30 PM EDT

Traumatic Brain Injury and Vulnerable Populations; An Important Role for Speech-Language Pathology

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is highly prevalent among vulnerable and underserved populations such as those in the criminal justice system, and those who are homeless or unstably housed. In fact, the prevalence of TBI among these populations is a serious public health issue. Not surprisingly, a history of TBI (diagnosed or suspected) precedes their experience of criminal involvement and or homelessness for many. More recently, there is increased awareness of TBI among women survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV). Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, statistics showed that 1 in 4 women would experience IPV in their life-time, however throughout the pandemic, this has increased to 1 in 3. The majority of these individuals have not had access to proper diagnosis, care and rehabilitation.

The communication challenges associated with TBI including cognitive-communication disorders and social communication disorders are often superimposed upon pre-existing language and literacy issues for some of these individuals. Moreover, these communication disorders negatively impact outcomes and community reintegration and can be a factor in recidivism for those who are justice involved.

Speech-language pathologists can play an important role in mitigating these challenges through direct intervention as well as through training of front-line staff.

This presentation will provide opportunities for learning through didactic lecture, video, as well as discussion and audience small group activities.

Learning objectives:

  • Understand the prevalence of traumatic brain injury among vulnerable populations
  • Understand the intersection of psychological trauma in concert with physical and brain trauma
  • Identify the cognitive-communication and social communication impairments that contribute to vulnerability
  • Understand the role of speech-language pathology in assessing and treating these individuals
  • Learn specific strategies and techniques to support these individuals
  • Understand the value and importance of education and training of front-line staff
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

Adult (18-64)

3:45 PM – 4:15 PM EDT

The Modified Token Test: A New Way to Assess Working Memory and Linguistic Skills

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Theresa Pham, University of Western Ontario; Lisa Archibald, PhD, University of Western Ontario.

To process sentences, children use working memory (WM) – the ability to retain and process the sentences – and language knowledge. Speech-language pathologists (S-LPs) therefore need to understand whether WM and/or language weakness underlie poor language performance. The Token Test, wherein sentences vary in length and syntactic complexity, might help S-LPs in practice. We studied the test’s structure and found: (1) a verbal WM component consisted of long (and syntactically consistent) sentences, and (2) a linguistic factor that included syntactically complex sentences. Our modified Token Test is a promising tool that could be used to disentangle WM and linguistic knowledge.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

3:50 PM – 4:35 PM EDT

A Research-School Collaboration to Support Adolescents with Developmental Language Disorder

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors: Chantal Desmarais, Professor, Université Laval; Maude Garant; Véronique Caron; Marie-Ève Lamontagne; Marie-Catherine St-Pierre; Francine Julien-Gauthier

Adolescents with developmental language disorder (AwDLD) face learning and integration challenges in various contexts, including school. Meanwhile, teachers feel insufficiently trained to support AwDLD. This project addresses this gap via a researcher-school co-design implementation of a teacher led and S-LP supported intervention to improve communication and social abilities of AwDLD. The interactive seminar will cover the objectives and the 16 in-class activities as well as the steps of the project from the logic model to the implementation of the intervention. These will be embedded in the general principles of integrated knowledge transfer that served as a framework for the project.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

School Aged (5-17)

4:30 PM – 5:00 PM EDT

Break

 

5:00 PM – 5:45 PM EDT

Assessing Comprehension in Children with Low Speech/Motor Function: Supporting Implementation of the C-BiLLT in Canada

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Jael Bootsma, McMaster University; Kristine Stadskleiv, PhD, University of Oslo; Michelle Phoenix, PhD, McMaster University; Johanna Geytenbeek, PhD, Amsterdam UMC; Jan Willem Gorter, MD, PhD, FRCP(C), Universitair Medisch Centrum Utrecht; Dayle McCauley, MSc, McMaster University; Sara Fiske; University of Oslo; Fiona Campbell, McMaster University; Natasha Crews, Western University; BJ Cunningham, PhD, Western University.

Assessing language comprehension in children with Cerebral Palsy and low motor and speech function is challenging as existing tools require children to speak, point, and manipulate objects. An innovative new tool, the Computer-Based instrument for Low motor Language Testing (C-BiLLT) is now available to addresses this issue by allowing children to respond using access methods that suit their needs. The C-BiLLT is used widely in Europe and was recently validated in Canada by our team. We will give an overview of the C-BiLLT, and present findings from our European study that will be used to support implementation in Canada.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

5:50 PM – 6:35 PM EDT

Indicateurs normatifs du développement du langage en français québécois de 3 à 5,5 ans

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Mélissa Di Sante, Ph.D., Centre de recherche en santé publique (CReSP), Université de Montréal; Audette Sylvestre, Ph.D., Centre interdisciplinaire de recherche en réadaptation et intégration sociale (CIRRIS), Université Laval; Jean Leblond, Ph.D., Centre interdisciplinaire de recherche en réadaptation et intégration sociale (CIRRIS).

L’objectif de cette étude était de présenter des indicateurs normatifs du développement du vocabulaire réceptif et expressif, des composantes phonologiques et morphosyntaxique du langage expressif d’enfants québécois unilingues francophones âgés de 3 à 5,5 ans. Les données ont été collectées auprès de 99 enfants du groupe de comparaison de l’Étude longitudinale sur le langage et la négligence (ELLAN). Les données normatives développées par la présente étude contribuent à l’avancement des connaissances sur le développement typique du langage en français et offre des points de repère indispensables pour le travail clinique et la recherche en orthophonie.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)