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Thursday


Opening Ceremony & Keynote Speaker

 

11:00 AM – 2:30 PM EDT

Assessment of Children with Speech Sound Disorders: Identification of Sub-Types

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Children with speech sound disorders produce many more speech sound errors than expected for their age and may be unintelligible. This population of children is known to be heterogenous in underlying etiology, primary psycholinguistic factors, and surface presentation. A detailed assessment helps the S-LP understand the child’s needs and choose the treatment approach that is most likely to be effective.

Learning objectives:

  • Psycholinguistic factors that explain speech sound disorders in different sub-populations of children with severe speech sound disorders;
  • Application of assessment tools for diagnosis and treatment planning;
  • Interpretation of assessment results using case studies representing a phonological processing deficit, a phonological memory impairment, and childhood apraxia of speech; and
  • Suggested treatment approaches for these sub-types of speech sound disorder, based on the research evidence.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

11:00 AM – 2:30 PM EDT

Autism: Beyond the Male Presentation

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Males with autism far outnumber females, right? Not so fast. Recent investigations reveal a vast number of girls who are "hiding in plain sight." Furthermore, it may not only be females who are under identified; there is a significant overlap between autistics and queers. Some recommend autism clinics be sensitive to the potential of individuals whose gender is fluid, and they similarly suggest gender identity clinics be informed as to the possibility of autism. Therefore, we may need to heighten our awareness; and possibly cast a wider net in order to be more inclusive in our search for those who need an autism diagnosis.

Some may conclude that identification and support are not needed if in fact they are not being identified, however, that simply is not the case. Many of these individuals actually receive diagnoses, but typically in the psychiatric domain, not the developmental disability realm. Awareness and a correct diagnosis have the potential to prevent prolonged suffering with these individuals.

Learning objectives:

  • Examine the different presentations of autism as a function of gender, with an emphasis on the characteristics that all too often are missed. If these individuals are not identified, condition-specific support cannot be rendered.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM EDT

Behavioural Swallowing Therapy for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: Evidence of Benefit Related to What, When and How Much

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

This session will be presented live only and will not be recorded for viewing at a later date.

Various treatments for oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with head and neck cancer have been introduced and studied over the years. Behavioural exercise therapies offer the opportunity for long-term change in the swallow, mediated in principle by changes to the central control of swallow via neuroplasticity. However, it is unclear what therapies to provide, when to offer them and how much therapy yields the most benefit. This session will provide a comprehensive review of the available behavioural therapies with an in-depth analysis of evidence for their benefit in patients with head and neck cancer. A novel therapy will be introduced called, EAT-RT (Eat All Through Radiotherapy), developed specifically to maintain oral intake throughout radiotherapy in order to avoid disuse of swallowing muscles.

Learning objectives:

  • Review the evidence of behavioural swallowing therapies available for patients with head and neck cancer.
  • Compare and contrast the available therapies according to what, when and how much.
  • Describe a novel therapy, EAT-RT, that aims to facilitate maintenance of oral intake throughout head and neck radiotherapy.
  • Demonstrate how EAT-RT establishes goal setting for oral intake during routine mealtime throughout radiotherapy and beyond.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM EDT

Interdisciplinary, Integrated, Person-Centred Assessments for Persons Living with Dementia

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Margaret K Pichora-Fuller, PhD, U. Toronto; Walter Wittich, PhD, U. Montreal; Natalie Phillips, PhD, Concordia U; Marilyn Reed, MSc, Baycrest Hospital; JB Orange, PhD, Western University.

Speech-language pathologists, working with other key members of interprofessional health care teams, are positioned ideally to be active leaders in providing and promoting integrated, person-centred care for persons living with dementia.

The aim of our mini-seminar is to provide evidence of the value to speech-language pathologists to collaborate with colleagues in audiology, vision rehabilitation and neuropsychology. Such collaborations can deliver integrated, interprofessional person-centred care based on older adults’ hearing, vision, cognition, speech production, language and cognitive-communication abilities and functional needs.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Senior (65+)

11:30 AM – 12:30 PM EDT

Deconstructing “Hard to Serve” in Approaches with Indigenous Clients and Communities

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

This highly interactive session will explore how a relational approach to practice with Indigenous clients and communities can yield positive results. Participants will consider how many of the methods and tools that are considered mainstays of professional practice are not working with Indigenous clients or in Indigenous community contexts. The presenter will discuss the concept of cultural safety and what professionals can do to increase client’s experiences of cultural safety. The presentation will also highlight the value of partnerships with families and communities, rather than an expert-client dichotomy in assessment and intervention. Working in small groups, participants will explore how these concepts and approaches can be applied in their own practice.

Learning objectives:

  • Enhance awareness of cultural safety and how self-location can influence practice.
  • Be able to identify indicators of cultural unsafety in client’s responses to S-LP services.
  • Heighten consciousness of how the professional canon of methods and tools can be broadened to bring a critical perspective to practice with culturally diverse clients.
  • Identify ways to partner with families and community programs.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

12:30 PM – 1:00 PM EDT

Break

Sponsored by:

1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EDT

A Call to Action: Honouring Diverse Communication Value Systems and Socialization Practices in Indigenous Contexts

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

This highly interactive session will encourage practitioners to hone their ability to think critically about the application of mainstream methods and tools when working with Indigenous clients and communities. Participants will be encouraged to create new methods and tools that honour local value systems and practices surrounding communication. The presenter will discuss some of the core strengths found in many Indigenous families that can be built upon in practice, including story-telling, land-based learning, and listening. Attention to distinctive features of speech and communication systems, often referred to as First Nations English dialects, will be discussed. Working in small groups, participants will explore how their awareness of distinctive communication systems and strengths in Indigenous contexts has affected the ways in which they provide services.

Learning objectives:

  • Enhance awareness of cultural diversity in communication values and socialization practices.
  • Be able to describe frequently encountered features of Indigenous language practices.
  • Know promising ways to honour Indigenous speech and language systems in practice?
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

1:00 PM – 1:45 PM EDT

Language Assessment in Bilingual Adults and the Need of Linguistically and Culturally Adapted Tools

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Author: Sophie Laurence, Assistant Professor, Laurentian University.

The assessment of acquired language disorders in bilingual adults is a complex process. Bilingual individuals living in a minority setting often face a lack of access to native-speaking S-LPs and the lack of standardized assessment tools in French.

This research summarizes the recommendations regarding the assessment of language in bilingual adults. The results of a survey answered by SLPs across Ontario, highlight the challenges faced by S-LPs when assessing language in bilingual adults and their potential solutions. To implement one of the suggested solutions, the Western Aphasia Battery-Revised was adapted to the Franco-Ontarian population.

Speaker(s)

Sophie Laurence

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists

Age Group(s)

Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

1:50 PM – 2:35 PM EDT

A Client-centered Approach to Hybrid Service Delivery of AAC for Adults

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Stacey N Harpell, M.S., CCC-SLP; Reg BC, CAYA Communication Assistance for Youth and Adults; Monica Francella, SLP, CAYA Communication Assistance for Youth and Adults; Rheanne Brownridge, SLP, CAYA Communication Assistance for Youth and Adults; Tara Commandeur, SLP, CAYA Communication Assistance for Youth and Adults; Jan Dunn, SLPA, CAYA Communication Assistance for Youth and Adults; Kristi Wintemute, SLPA, CAYA Communication Assistance for Youth and Adults; Sarah Douglas, RA.

Communication Assistance for Youth and Adults (CAYA) provides Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) services to adults in British Columbia. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic demanded a shift in service delivery from in-person to a hybrid delivery model combining in-person and virtual service for CAYA. This presentation will discuss a client-centered approach to hybrid service delivery of AAC for adults. We will provide an overview of the evidence-based resources created to ensure clinical, cultural, and technical considerations for client-centered hybrid service delivery. Case studies will illustrate real-life applications of the resources, which include a service delivery outline, E-supporter guidelines, and more.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

2:30 PM – 3:00 PM EDT

Break

Sponsored by:

3:00 PM – 3:45 PM EDT

La communauté de pratique: moyen pour améliorer les pratiques orthophoniques ?

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Lyne Defoy, orthophoniste; Vincent Martel-Sauvageau, PhD, Université Laval; Imane Hocine, orthophoniste; Ingrid Verduyckt, PhD, Université de Montréal.

Les communautés de pratique (CdP) sont identifiées comme un moyen intéressant pour le transfert des connaissances et l’amélioration des pratiques cliniques. Ce séminaire vise à partager notre expérience avec le développement et les retombées à court terme d'une CdP en orthophonie de la voix. À travers l’exemple de notre CdP et des illustrations de la littérature, les participants apprendront ce qu’est une CdP, ses avantages et désavantages, les moyens matériels et les ressources humaines nécessaires à sa création et à son maintien. Nous partagerons également des outils permettant d’identifier les barrières et les facilitateurs à la création d’une CdP.

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

3:00 PM – 6:30 PM EDT

Learn to Play for the S-LP: Taking Knowledge into Practice

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

This session will be based on the fundamentals of the Learn to Play program by Dr. Karen Stagnitti. These fundamental play skills are the foundation of their social and academic success and are an important consideration in any treatment plan of a child with social and language concerns. The course will discuss how to take the knowledge of different types of players and core developmental play skills and apply it to assessment and treatment in a variety of settings with a variety of populations in a fun and functional way.

Learning objectives:

  • Review different types of players and the six core skills of imaginative play.
  • Understand how to assess and interpret results related to language and social skill development for children of all ages, including children with complex developmental delays/disorders.
  • Learn how to take assessment information to develop an effective treatment plan.
  • Learn implementation strategies for early intervention, kindergarten, elementary and high school students.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

3:00 PM – 6:30 PM EDT

Promoting the Acquisition of Literacy Skills in At-Risk Preschoolers

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

When children enter kindergarten, they are not all equally predisposed to acquire literacy skills at the optimum rate. The risk for delayed acquisition of literacy is higher in two groups of children specifically: those who have received less exposure to pre-literacy experiences, especially in the school language; and those who are at biological risk of slower learning in the literacy domain, especially due to deficits in phonological processing. This session will explore predictors of literacy skills, following children from preschool age through the early school years.

Learning objectives:

  • Approaches to supporting the development of emergent literacy skills in these children will be presented.
  • Strategies that employ direct and indirect teaching and standard and digital materials will be described.
  • The particular risk factors experienced by young boys will be considered.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

School Aged (5-17)

3:00 PM – 4:30 PM EDT

The 3 M’s: From Mentee to Mentor to Management

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

“Oh the places you’ll go!” – Dr. Seuss

Have you ever thought about branching out in your practice? Are there positions that interest you but you are not sure if you are a good fit? Is the landscape in your area changing and you wonder how it will impact your service? How do S-LPs evolve?

In this session, we will explore the career paths of speech-language pathologists who have taken on differing roles in their careers: that of SAC mentee, SAC mentor, private practitioner, manager and administrator. Each panel member will provide insight into their career path choices as well as the supports and experiences that led them to their current roles. Panel members will also discuss how S-LPs can leverage their unique skill sets to assume a variety of roles.

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

3:00 PM – 4:00 PM EDT

Valves, Pumps and Tubes: A (Bio)Mechanical Perspective on the Aerodigestive Tract Following Critical Illness

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

This session will be presented live only and will not be recorded for viewing at a later date.

Care provision for survivors of critical illness relies on dynamic knowledge of multiple integrated body systems, disease mechanisms and medical interventions. The aerodigestive tract (AT), one such system, performs multiple functions like breathing and swallowing. Whether due to their illness or iatrogenesis, many survivors of critical illness face challenges during recovery, including dysphagia. A cross-systems approach to swallowing provides some basis for how its function is hindered or facilitated in both health and disease. Furthermore, understanding the connection among AT biomechanics and complex pathophysiologies following critical illness may inform swallowing screening, assessment and rehabilitation in this population. This session will explore an integrated AT framework both in health and following critical illness, particularly for those receiving invasive ventilation, discuss current research and consider implications for swallowing assessment and dysphagia management.

Learning objectives:

Attendees will be able to:

  • Describe multi-system integration during swallowing in both health and critical illness.
  • Understand emerging swallowing profiles and dysphagia risk factors following invasive ventilation.
  • Explore a cross-systems conceptual framework for swallowing assessment and dysphagia management following critical illness and invasive ventilation.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

Adult (18-64)

3:50 PM – 4:35 PM EDT

Outcomes Management for Speech-Language Services in Ontario Schools: A Directed Content Analysis

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Peter T Cahill, McMaster University; Stella Ng, University of Toronto; Leah Dix, McMaster University; Lyn Turkstra, McMaster University; Mark A Ferro, University of Waterloo; Wenonah N Campbell, McMaster University.

Assessing, measuring, and managing outcomes in schools is challenging, as schools are complex practice environments with both health and educational influences. Additionally, school-based service delivery has rapidly evolved towards tiered approaches, introducing another potential challenge as outcomes management depends on service design. We explored how outcomes were being managed in Ontario school boards in anticipation of a provincial transition to tiered services. Preliminary results indicate that clinicians have developed diverse techniques to measure, assess, and manage outcomes. However, the transition to tiered approaches requires additional innovation to assess and manage a broader set of outcome concepts across tiers.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists

Age Group(s)

School Aged (5-17)

4:30 PM – 5:00 PM EDT

Break

 

5:00 PM – 6:30 PM EDT

Deepening our Understanding of Parent Coaching

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Michaela Jelen, M.Ed, University of Alberta and JHMJ Coaching & Consulting; Janet Harder, MSLP, JHMJ Coaching & Consulting; Veronica Smith, PhD, University of Alberta.

This presentation will provide an overview of parent coaching with the aim of contributing to a greater understanding of parent coaching practices in early intervention. The presenters will draw from research evidence; clinical expertise garnered from practicing, supervising, and training EI professionals in parent coaching; and caregiver perspectives of coaching experiences.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)