Daily Schedule

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Age Group

Thursday

7:30 AM – 8:00 AM

Breakfast

Join us for breakfast and stay for opening ceremony and keynote presentation.

8:00 AM – 9:00 AM

Opening Ceremony & Keynote Speaker

Times and content subject to change

9:15 AM – 12:30 PM

Assessment of Children with Speech Sound Disorders: Identification of Sub-Types

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

Children with speech sound disorders produce many more speech sound errors than expected for their age and may be unintelligible. This population of children is known to be heterogenous in underlying etiology, primary psycholinguistic factors, and surface presentation. A detailed assessment helps the S-LP understand the child’s needs and choose the treatment approach that is most likely to be effective.

Learning objectives:

  • Psycholinguistic factors that explain speech sound disorders in different sub-populations of children with severe speech sound disorders;
  • Application of assessment tools for diagnosis and treatment planning;
  • Interpretation of assessment results using case studies representing a phonological processing deficit, a phonological memory impairment, and childhood apraxia of speech; and
  • Suggested treatment approaches for these sub-types of speech sound disorder, based on the research evidence.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

9:15 AM – 12:30 PM

Autism: Beyond the Male Presentation

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

Males with autism far outnumber females, right? Not so fast. Recent investigations reveal a vast number of girls who are "hiding in plain sight." Furthermore, it may not only be females who are under identified; there is a significant overlap between autistics and queers. Some recommend autism clinics be sensitive to the potential of individuals whose gender is fluid, and they similarly suggest gender identity clinics be informed as to the possibility of autism. Therefore, we may need to heighten our awareness; and possibly cast a wider net in order to be more inclusive in our search for those who need an autism diagnosis.

Some may conclude that identification and support are not needed if in fact they are not being identified, however, that simply is not the case. Many of these individuals actually receive diagnoses, but typically in the psychiatric domain, not the developmental disability realm. Awareness and a correct diagnosis have the potential to prevent prolonged suffering with these individuals.

Learning objectives:

  • Examine the different presentations of autism as a function of gender, with an emphasis on the characteristics that all too often are missed. If these individuals are not identified, condition-specific support cannot be rendered.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

9:15 AM – 12:30 PM

Behavioural Swallowing Therapy for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: Evidence of Benefit Related to What, When and How Much

The language used in the descriptions reflects the language of the sessions.

Various treatments for oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with head and neck cancer have been introduced and studied over the years. Behavioural exercise therapies offer the opportunity for long-term change in the swallow, mediated in principle by changes to the central control of swallow via neuroplasticity. However, it is unclear what therapies to provide, when to offer them and how much therapy yields the most benefit. This session will provide a comprehensive review of the available behavioural therapies with an in-depth analysis of evidence for their benefit in patients with head and neck cancer. A novel therapy will be introduced called, EAT-RT (Eat All Through Radiotherapy), developed specifically to maintain oral intake throughout radiotherapy in order to avoid disuse of swallowing muscles.

Learning objectives:

  • Review the evidence of behavioural swallowing therapies available for patients with head and neck cancer.
  • Compare and contrast the available therapies according to what, when and how much.
  • Describe a novel therapy, EAT-RT, that aims to facilitate maintenance of oral intake throughout head and neck radiotherapy.
  • Demonstrate how EAT-RT establishes goal setting for oral intake during routine mealtime throughout radiotherapy and beyond.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

9:15 AM – 10:45 AM

Deconstructing “Hard to Serve” in Approaches with Indigenous Clients and Communities

The language used in the descriptions reflects the language of the sessions.

This highly interactive session will explore how a relational approach to practice with Indigenous clients and communities can yield positive results. Participants will consider how many of the methods and tools that are considered mainstays of professional practice are not working with Indigenous clients or in Indigenous community contexts. The presenter will discuss the concept of cultural safety and what professionals can do to increase client’s experiences of cultural safety. The presentation will also highlight the value of partnerships with families and communities, rather than an expert-client dichotomy in assessment and intervention. Working in small groups, participants will explore how these concepts and approaches can be applied in their own practice.

Learning objectives:

  • Enhance awareness of cultural safety and how self-location can influence practice.
  • Be able to identify indicators of cultural unsafety in client’s responses to S-LP services.
  • Heighten consciousness of how the professional canon of methods and tools can be broadened to bring a critical perspective to practice with culturally diverse clients.
  • Identify ways to partner with families and community programs.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

9:15 AM – 10:45 AM

The Ins and Outs of Private Practice

The language used in the descriptions reflects the language of the sessions.

This presentation will feature three different approaches to running your own private speech-language pathology practice in a panel format.

Learning objectives:

  • Getting started: Is Private Practice for you?
  • Considerations for growth
  • Marketing and social media
  • Networking and building relationships in the community
  • Tips for running an efficient business: scheduling, cancellations and no shows
  • Use of assistants and volunteers
  • Costs (e.g., becoming incorporated, legal fees, other overhead)
  • Documentation and file retention
  • Treatment considerations
  • Where to get support

Following the panel presentation, there will be a question period to support participants in developing a greater understanding of private practice.

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

10:45 AM – 11:00 AM

Morning Break

Join us for refreshments on the trade show floor and meet with the exhibitors.

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM

A Call to Action: Honouring Diverse Communication Value Systems and Socialization Practices in Indigenous Contexts

The language used in the descriptions reflects the language of the sessions.

This highly interactive session will encourage practitioners to hone their ability to think critically about the application of mainstream methods and tools when working with Indigenous clients and communities. Participants will be encouraged to create new methods and tools that honour local value systems and practices surrounding communication. The presenter will discuss some of the core strengths found in many Indigenous families that can be built upon in practice, including story-telling, land-based learning, and listening. Attention to distinctive features of speech and communication systems, often referred to as First Nations English dialects, will be discussed. Working in small groups, participants will explore how their awareness of distinctive communication systems and strengths in Indigenous contexts has affected the ways in which they provide services.

Learning objectives:

Enhance awareness of cultural diversity in communication values and socialization practices.

Be able to describe frequently encountered features of Indigenous language practices.

Know promising ways to honour Indigenous speech and language systems in practice?

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM

Lunch in Exhibit Hall

Join us for lunch on the trade show floor and meet with the exhibitors.

1:30 PM – 5:00 PM

Learn to Play for the S-LP: Taking Knowledge into Practice

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

This session will be based on the fundamentals of the Learn to Play program by Dr. Karen Stagnitti. These fundamental play skills are the foundation of their social and academic success and are an important consideration in any treatment plan of a child with social and language concerns. The course will discuss how to take the knowledge of different types of players and core developmental play skills and apply it to assessment and treatment in a variety of settings with a variety of populations in a fun and functional way.

Learning objectives:

  • Review different types of players and the six core skills of imaginative play.
  • Understand how to assess and interpret results related to language and social skill development for children of all ages, including children with complex developmental delays/disorders.
  • Learn how to take assessment information to develop an effective treatment plan.
  • Learn implementation strategies for early intervention, kindergarten, elementary and high school students.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

1:30 PM – 5:00 PM

Promoting the Acquisition of Literacy Skills in At-Risk Preschoolers

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

When children enter kindergarten, they are not all equally predisposed to acquire literacy skills at the optimum rate. The risk for delayed acquisition of literacy is higher in two groups of children specifically: those who have received less exposure to pre-literacy experiences, especially in the school language; and those who are at biological risk of slower learning in the literacy domain, especially due to deficits in phonological processing. This session will explore predictors of literacy skills, following children from preschool age through the early school years.

Learning objectives:

  • Approaches to supporting the development of emergent literacy skills in these children will be presented.
  • Strategies that employ direct and indirect teaching and standard and digital materials will be described.
  • The particular risk factors experienced by young boys will be considered.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

School Aged (5-17)

1:30 PM – 3:00 PM

Valves, Pumps and Tubes: A (Bio)Mechanical Perspective on the Aerodigestive Tract Following Critical Illness

The language used in the descriptions reflects the language of the sessions.

Care provision for survivors of critical illness relies on dynamic knowledge of multiple integrated body systems, disease mechanisms and medical interventions. The aerodigestive tract (AT), one such system, performs multiple functions like breathing and swallowing. Whether due to their illness or iatrogenesis, many survivors of critical illness face challenges during recovery, including dysphagia. A cross-systems approach to swallowing provides some basis for how its function is hindered or facilitated in both health and disease. Furthermore, understanding the connection among AT biomechanics and complex pathophysiologies following critical illness may inform swallowing screening, assessment and rehabilitation in this population. This session will explore an integrated AT framework both in health and following critical illness, particularly for those receiving invasive ventilation, discuss current research and consider implications for swallowing assessment and dysphagia management.

Learning objectives:

Attendees will be able to:

  • Describe multi-system integration during swallowing in both health and critical illness.
  • Understand emerging swallowing profiles and dysphagia risk factors following invasive ventilation.
  • Explore a cross-systems conceptual framework for swallowing assessment and dysphagia management following critical illness and invasive ventilation.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

Adult (18-64)

3:00 PM – 3:30 PM

Afternoon Break

Join us for refreshments on the trade show floor and meet with the exhibitors.

3:30 PM – 5:00 PM

Engaging Patients Partners: An Essential Step Toward Maximizing the Quality of Care and Research

The language used in the descriptions reflects the language of the sessions.

The patient perspective and ultimately their care priorities are different from that of clinicians and researchers. Engaging patients and their caregivers as partners in how we design research and/or plan care delivery offers a unique lived experience that informs clinicians of potential barriers and the strategies on how to mitigate them. Patient partners offer unique insight into health care and are integral members in the conception, development, and execution of clinical practice and/or research. Furthermore, patients offer clinicians insights that support successful translation and dissemination. We will provide an overview of patient-oriented research and clinical practice as well as an introduction to involving patient partners in both domains. We will share our own real world successes in partnering with patients in both the clinical and research realm. An interactive Q&A with the speakers will follow the didactic portion of this session.

Learning objectives:

  • Provide an overview of patient-oriented clinical practice and research, highlighting its need in health care.
  • Understand patient partner onboarding and involvement through “real world” examples.
  • Recognize patient motivation and rationale behind engaging in planning health care provision and research.
Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

Adult (18-64)

5:00 PM – 6:00 PM

Welcome Reception

Times and content subject to change.