Daily Schedule

Search Sessions
Age Group

Thursday


Opening Ceremony & Keynote Speaker

 

11:00 AM – 2:30 PM EDT

Assessment of Children with Speech Sound Disorders: Identification of Sub-Types

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Children with speech sound disorders produce many more speech sound errors than expected for their age and may be unintelligible. This population of children is known to be heterogenous in underlying etiology, primary psycholinguistic factors, and surface presentation. A detailed assessment helps the S-LP understand the child’s needs and choose the treatment approach that is most likely to be effective.

Learning objectives:

  • Psycholinguistic factors that explain speech sound disorders in different sub-populations of children with severe speech sound disorders;
  • Application of assessment tools for diagnosis and treatment planning;
  • Interpretation of assessment results using case studies representing a phonological processing deficit, a phonological memory impairment, and childhood apraxia of speech; and
  • Suggested treatment approaches for these sub-types of speech sound disorder, based on the research evidence.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

11:00 AM – 2:30 PM EDT

Autism: Beyond the Male Presentation

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Males with autism far outnumber females, right? Not so fast. Recent investigations reveal a vast number of girls who are "hiding in plain sight." Furthermore, it may not only be females who are under identified; there is a significant overlap between autistics and queers. Some recommend autism clinics be sensitive to the potential of individuals whose gender is fluid, and they similarly suggest gender identity clinics be informed as to the possibility of autism. Therefore, we may need to heighten our awareness; and possibly cast a wider net in order to be more inclusive in our search for those who need an autism diagnosis.

Some may conclude that identification and support are not needed if in fact they are not being identified, however, that simply is not the case. Many of these individuals actually receive diagnoses, but typically in the psychiatric domain, not the developmental disability realm. Awareness and a correct diagnosis have the potential to prevent prolonged suffering with these individuals.

Learning objectives:

  • Examine the different presentations of autism as a function of gender, with an emphasis on the characteristics that all too often are missed. If these individuals are not identified, condition-specific support cannot be rendered.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM EDT

Behavioural Swallowing Therapy for Patients with Head and Neck Cancer: Evidence of Benefit Related to What, When and How Much

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

This session will be presented live only and will not be recorded for viewing at a later date.

Various treatments for oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with head and neck cancer have been introduced and studied over the years. Behavioural exercise therapies offer the opportunity for long-term change in the swallow, mediated in principle by changes to the central control of swallow via neuroplasticity. However, it is unclear what therapies to provide, when to offer them and how much therapy yields the most benefit. This session will provide a comprehensive review of the available behavioural therapies with an in-depth analysis of evidence for their benefit in patients with head and neck cancer. A novel therapy will be introduced called, EAT-RT (Eat All Through Radiotherapy), developed specifically to maintain oral intake throughout radiotherapy in order to avoid disuse of swallowing muscles.

Learning objectives:

  • Review the evidence of behavioural swallowing therapies available for patients with head and neck cancer.
  • Compare and contrast the available therapies according to what, when and how much.
  • Describe a novel therapy, EAT-RT, that aims to facilitate maintenance of oral intake throughout head and neck radiotherapy.
  • Demonstrate how EAT-RT establishes goal setting for oral intake during routine mealtime throughout radiotherapy and beyond.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM EDT

Interdisciplinary, Integrated, Person-Centred Assessments for Persons Living with Dementia

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Margaret K Pichora-Fuller, PhD, U. Toronto; Walter Wittich, PhD, U. Montreal; Natalie Phillips, PhD, Concordia U; Marilyn Reed, MSc, Baycrest Hospital; JB Orange, PhD, Western University.

Speech-language pathologists, working with other key members of interprofessional health care teams, are positioned ideally to be active leaders in providing and promoting integrated, person-centred care for persons living with dementia.

The aim of our mini-seminar is to provide evidence of the value to speech-language pathologists to collaborate with colleagues in audiology, vision rehabilitation and neuropsychology. Such collaborations can deliver integrated, interprofessional person-centred care based on older adults’ hearing, vision, cognition, speech production, language and cognitive-communication abilities and functional needs.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Senior (65+)

11:30 AM – 12:30 PM EDT

Deconstructing “Hard to Serve” in Approaches with Indigenous Clients and Communities

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

This highly interactive session will explore how a relational approach to practice with Indigenous clients and communities can yield positive results. Participants will consider how many of the methods and tools that are considered mainstays of professional practice are not working with Indigenous clients or in Indigenous community contexts. The presenter will discuss the concept of cultural safety and what professionals can do to increase client’s experiences of cultural safety. The presentation will also highlight the value of partnerships with families and communities, rather than an expert-client dichotomy in assessment and intervention. Working in small groups, participants will explore how these concepts and approaches can be applied in their own practice.

Learning objectives:

  • Enhance awareness of cultural safety and how self-location can influence practice.
  • Be able to identify indicators of cultural unsafety in client’s responses to S-LP services.
  • Heighten consciousness of how the professional canon of methods and tools can be broadened to bring a critical perspective to practice with culturally diverse clients.
  • Identify ways to partner with families and community programs.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

12:30 PM – 1:00 PM EDT

Break

Sponsored by:

1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EDT

A Call to Action: Honouring Diverse Communication Value Systems and Socialization Practices in Indigenous Contexts

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

This highly interactive session will encourage practitioners to hone their ability to think critically about the application of mainstream methods and tools when working with Indigenous clients and communities. Participants will be encouraged to create new methods and tools that honour local value systems and practices surrounding communication. The presenter will discuss some of the core strengths found in many Indigenous families that can be built upon in practice, including story-telling, land-based learning, and listening. Attention to distinctive features of speech and communication systems, often referred to as First Nations English dialects, will be discussed. Working in small groups, participants will explore how their awareness of distinctive communication systems and strengths in Indigenous contexts has affected the ways in which they provide services.

Learning objectives:

  • Enhance awareness of cultural diversity in communication values and socialization practices.
  • Be able to describe frequently encountered features of Indigenous language practices.
  • Know promising ways to honour Indigenous speech and language systems in practice?
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

1:00 PM – 1:45 PM EDT

Language Assessment in Bilingual Adults and the Need of Linguistically and Culturally Adapted Tools

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Author: Sophie Laurence, Assistant Professor, Laurentian University.

The assessment of acquired language disorders in bilingual adults is a complex process. Bilingual individuals living in a minority setting often face a lack of access to native-speaking S-LPs and the lack of standardized assessment tools in French.

This research summarizes the recommendations regarding the assessment of language in bilingual adults. The results of a survey answered by SLPs across Ontario, highlight the challenges faced by S-LPs when assessing language in bilingual adults and their potential solutions. To implement one of the suggested solutions, the Western Aphasia Battery-Revised was adapted to the Franco-Ontarian population.

Speaker(s)

Sophie Laurence

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists

Age Group(s)

Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

1:50 PM – 2:35 PM EDT

A Client-centered Approach to Hybrid Service Delivery of AAC for Adults

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Stacey N Harpell, M.S., CCC-SLP; Reg BC, CAYA Communication Assistance for Youth and Adults; Monica Francella, SLP, CAYA Communication Assistance for Youth and Adults; Rheanne Brownridge, SLP, CAYA Communication Assistance for Youth and Adults; Tara Commandeur, SLP, CAYA Communication Assistance for Youth and Adults; Jan Dunn, SLPA, CAYA Communication Assistance for Youth and Adults; Kristi Wintemute, SLPA, CAYA Communication Assistance for Youth and Adults; Sarah Douglas, RA.

Communication Assistance for Youth and Adults (CAYA) provides Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) services to adults in British Columbia. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic demanded a shift in service delivery from in-person to a hybrid delivery model combining in-person and virtual service for CAYA. This presentation will discuss a client-centered approach to hybrid service delivery of AAC for adults. We will provide an overview of the evidence-based resources created to ensure clinical, cultural, and technical considerations for client-centered hybrid service delivery. Case studies will illustrate real-life applications of the resources, which include a service delivery outline, E-supporter guidelines, and more.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

2:30 PM – 3:00 PM EDT

Break

Sponsored by:

3:00 PM – 3:45 PM EDT

La communauté de pratique: moyen pour améliorer les pratiques orthophoniques ?

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Lyne Defoy, orthophoniste; Vincent Martel-Sauvageau, PhD, Université Laval; Imane Hocine, orthophoniste; Ingrid Verduyckt, PhD, Université de Montréal.

Les communautés de pratique (CdP) sont identifiées comme un moyen intéressant pour le transfert des connaissances et l’amélioration des pratiques cliniques. Ce séminaire vise à partager notre expérience avec le développement et les retombées à court terme d'une CdP en orthophonie de la voix. À travers l’exemple de notre CdP et des illustrations de la littérature, les participants apprendront ce qu’est une CdP, ses avantages et désavantages, les moyens matériels et les ressources humaines nécessaires à sa création et à son maintien. Nous partagerons également des outils permettant d’identifier les barrières et les facilitateurs à la création d’une CdP.

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

3:00 PM – 6:30 PM EDT

Learn to Play for the S-LP: Taking Knowledge into Practice

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

This session will be based on the fundamentals of the Learn to Play program by Dr. Karen Stagnitti. These fundamental play skills are the foundation of their social and academic success and are an important consideration in any treatment plan of a child with social and language concerns. The course will discuss how to take the knowledge of different types of players and core developmental play skills and apply it to assessment and treatment in a variety of settings with a variety of populations in a fun and functional way.

Learning objectives:

  • Review different types of players and the six core skills of imaginative play.
  • Understand how to assess and interpret results related to language and social skill development for children of all ages, including children with complex developmental delays/disorders.
  • Learn how to take assessment information to develop an effective treatment plan.
  • Learn implementation strategies for early intervention, kindergarten, elementary and high school students.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

3:00 PM – 6:30 PM EDT

Promoting the Acquisition of Literacy Skills in At-Risk Preschoolers

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

When children enter kindergarten, they are not all equally predisposed to acquire literacy skills at the optimum rate. The risk for delayed acquisition of literacy is higher in two groups of children specifically: those who have received less exposure to pre-literacy experiences, especially in the school language; and those who are at biological risk of slower learning in the literacy domain, especially due to deficits in phonological processing. This session will explore predictors of literacy skills, following children from preschool age through the early school years.

Learning objectives:

  • Approaches to supporting the development of emergent literacy skills in these children will be presented.
  • Strategies that employ direct and indirect teaching and standard and digital materials will be described.
  • The particular risk factors experienced by young boys will be considered.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

School Aged (5-17)

3:00 PM – 4:30 PM EDT

The 3 M’s: From Mentee to Mentor to Management

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

“Oh the places you’ll go!” – Dr. Seuss

Have you ever thought about branching out in your practice? Are there positions that interest you but you are not sure if you are a good fit? Is the landscape in your area changing and you wonder how it will impact your service? How do S-LPs evolve?

In this session, we will explore the career paths of speech-language pathologists who have taken on differing roles in their careers: that of SAC mentee, SAC mentor, private practitioner, manager and administrator. Each panel member will provide insight into their career path choices as well as the supports and experiences that led them to their current roles. Panel members will also discuss how S-LPs can leverage their unique skill sets to assume a variety of roles.

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

3:00 PM – 4:00 PM EDT

Valves, Pumps and Tubes: A (Bio)Mechanical Perspective on the Aerodigestive Tract Following Critical Illness

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

This session will be presented live only and will not be recorded for viewing at a later date.

Care provision for survivors of critical illness relies on dynamic knowledge of multiple integrated body systems, disease mechanisms and medical interventions. The aerodigestive tract (AT), one such system, performs multiple functions like breathing and swallowing. Whether due to their illness or iatrogenesis, many survivors of critical illness face challenges during recovery, including dysphagia. A cross-systems approach to swallowing provides some basis for how its function is hindered or facilitated in both health and disease. Furthermore, understanding the connection among AT biomechanics and complex pathophysiologies following critical illness may inform swallowing screening, assessment and rehabilitation in this population. This session will explore an integrated AT framework both in health and following critical illness, particularly for those receiving invasive ventilation, discuss current research and consider implications for swallowing assessment and dysphagia management.

Learning objectives:

Attendees will be able to:

  • Describe multi-system integration during swallowing in both health and critical illness.
  • Understand emerging swallowing profiles and dysphagia risk factors following invasive ventilation.
  • Explore a cross-systems conceptual framework for swallowing assessment and dysphagia management following critical illness and invasive ventilation.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

Adult (18-64)

3:50 PM – 4:35 PM EDT

Outcomes Management for Speech-Language Services in Ontario Schools: A Directed Content Analysis

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Peter T Cahill, McMaster University; Stella Ng, University of Toronto; Leah Dix, McMaster University; Lyn Turkstra, McMaster University; Mark A Ferro, University of Waterloo; Wenonah N Campbell, McMaster University.

Assessing, measuring, and managing outcomes in schools is challenging, as schools are complex practice environments with both health and educational influences. Additionally, school-based service delivery has rapidly evolved towards tiered approaches, introducing another potential challenge as outcomes management depends on service design. We explored how outcomes were being managed in Ontario school boards in anticipation of a provincial transition to tiered services. Preliminary results indicate that clinicians have developed diverse techniques to measure, assess, and manage outcomes. However, the transition to tiered approaches requires additional innovation to assess and manage a broader set of outcome concepts across tiers.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists

Age Group(s)

School Aged (5-17)

4:30 PM – 5:00 PM EDT

Break

 

5:00 PM – 6:30 PM EDT

Deepening our Understanding of Parent Coaching

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Michaela Jelen, M.Ed, University of Alberta and JHMJ Coaching & Consulting; Janet Harder, MSLP, JHMJ Coaching & Consulting; Veronica Smith, PhD, University of Alberta.

This presentation will provide an overview of parent coaching with the aim of contributing to a greater understanding of parent coaching practices in early intervention. The presenters will draw from research evidence; clinical expertise garnered from practicing, supervising, and training EI professionals in parent coaching; and caregiver perspectives of coaching experiences.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

Friday

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM EDT

An Update on Evidence-Based Interventions for Acquired Language Disorders Across the Continuum of Care

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Following a brief overview of contemporary conceptualizations of aphasia and other acquired language disorders and their management in a variety of healthcare settings, this presentation will critically review recently developed interventions designed to: (a) directly remediate acquired language disorders, common, concomitant extra-linguistic issues, or both, and (b) via compensatory approaches (e.g., communication partner training), indirectly address acquired language disorders, related concomitant impairments, or both.

Learning objectives:

  • Participants will be able to describe recently developed therapy procedures designed to directly address and remediate the linguistic and related concomitant symptoms of adults with aphasia or other acquired language disorders.
  • Participants will be able to describe recently developed therapy procedures designed to compensate for or indirectly address the linguistic and related concomitant symptoms of adults with aphasia or other acquired language disorders.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

11:00 AM – 2:30 PM EDT

Bilingual Children with Developmental Disorders on the Yellow Brick Road: Brain, Heart and Courage

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

The majority of the population in Canada is at least bilingual, and a significant proportion of children grow up speaking more than one language. However, when many of these children struggle with literacy and academic tasks in schools, it is often difficult for S-LPs to establish the degree to which these difficulties are associated, if at all, with the child’s language abilities. This presentation will discuss the most recent research-based recommendations for assessment of bilingual children, and will provide guiding principles on how to support pre-school and school-aged bilingual children who are neurodivergent or have language or cognitive delays

Learning objectives:

  • Describe differences between language delay vs. lack of language proficiency,
  • Identify additional difficulties that neurodivergent children who are bilingual experience in schools and why
  • Explain how oral languages is fundamental to literacy development
  • List some main approaches to assessment and intervention of bilingual children.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM EDT

Cultural Competence: Providing Inclusive Services to the LGBTQ+ Population

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

The recording for this live session will be available for viewing until May 27, 2022 only.

Authors:

Vincent Bourassa Bédard, MPO, PhD Candidate, Université de Montréal; Geneviève Meloni, MSc, PhD Candidate, Université de Montréal; Emma St-Laurent-Roberge, MPO, Centre de services scolaires Marie-Victorin.

Speech-Language & Audiology Canada’s (SAC, 2016) Code of Ethics states that its members should demonstrate acceptance toward their patients regardless of their sexual orientation or gender. However, recent studies in speech-language pathology show that most clinicians are not knowledgeable enough about LGBTQ+ issues. This issue leads to inequities in service access, meaning that the LGBTQ+ community do not always seek the needed care because of past negative experiences or fear of homophobic/transphobic comments. Through case studies, this workshop is specifically designed for all S-LPs so they can feel better equipped to provide inclusive services for all clients.

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM EDT

From Research to Practice: A Pivotal Response Treatment Group for Caregivers of Children with ASD

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Angele Fournier, M.Sc., R.SLP, S-LP(C), CASLPO, The Centre for Autism Services Alberta; Sally-Joy Nandee, R.SLP, S-LP(C), BCBA, The Centre for Autism Services Alberta; Michael Stolte, PhD (Special Education), C.C.C., R. Psych, The Centre for Autism Services Alberta.

We developed a community-based Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) group program for caregivers of autistic children. Caregivers were coached on the PRT motivational procedures for teaching first words. Outcome data was collected on caregiver fidelity of implementation, child functional verbal utterances, and caregivers completed qualitative questionnaires about the treatment. Results are summarized and suggest positive gains for both caregivers and their autistic children after participation in the program. Results also show that most caregivers liked the PRT procedures and felt they would lead to permanent improvements in their child’s communication.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

12:30 PM – 1:00 PM EDT

Break

Sponsored by:

1:00 PM – 1:45 PM EDT

Bilingualism, Narrative, Social and Pragmatic Skills in Children on the Autism Spectrum

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Myriam L. H. Beauchamp, M.S. SLP, PhD, McGill University; Stefano Rezzonico, PhD, Université de Montréal; Mayada Elsabbagh, PhD, McGill University; Eric Duku, PhD, McMaster University; Peter Szatmari, PhD, Centre for Addition and Mental Health, University of Toronto, The Hospital for Sick Children; Isabel Smith, PhD, Dalhousie University and Isaak Walton Killam Children’s Hospital; Connor Kerns, PhD, University of British Columbia; Lonnie Zwaigenbaum, PhD, University of Alberta; Patricia Mirenda, PhD, University of British Columbia; Terry Bennett, PhD, McMaster University.

Narrative skills are important for effective communication and academic achievement. However, difficulties with narratives are often reported in children on the autism spectrum (AS), and may stem from challenges with social and pragmatic skills. On the other hand, bilingual children on the AS may present stronger social skill when compared to their monolingual peers.

The current study compares the narrative, social and pragmatic skills of bilingual and monolingual school-aged children on the AS, and the relationship between these variables. The clinical implications of the findings from this study are also discussed.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

School Aged (5-17)

1:00 PM – 2:30 PM EDT

Discussion on the Impact of Systemic Racism in Speech-Language Pathology

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Laurence Charest, MScS, Centre de Services Scolaire de la Pointe-de-l'Île; Adalie Le Nguyen, MPO, Conseil Cri de la Santé et des Services Sociaux de la Baie James; Sandrine Umunoza, MScS, O(C), Cabinet d’orthophonie l’Envol.

This conference will discuss the impacts of direct and systemic racism in speech-language pathology through the presentation of the report from the Antiracism Action Group in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology. This report is based on studies in speech-language pathology, health science, reports from Statistics Canada and testimonials from speech-language pathologists (S-LP), as well as S-LP and audiology students studying in Québec. We will also offer action points and recommendations for our community to implement inclusive practices to validate ethnocultural differences. Attendees will learn how to become better allies, whether they work in universities, schools, health services or the private sector.

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

2:30 PM – 3:00 PM EDT

Break

Sponsored by:

3:00 PM – 6:30 PM EDT

Accessing It All: AAC Options for All Learners

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Deciding what communication system to trial with a client can be a very overwhelming process. Frequent questions such as paper-based or high tech? Dedicated or iPad? If dedicated, what system? If iPad, what app? are asked on a regular basis. The questions are almost endless as clinicians attempt to match specific features with specific clients. Now what happens if the client in question is not a direct selector or requires modifications to access a robust communication system? What options are then available?

A bulk of this presentation will be dedicated towards the different types of access methods that may be required for a clinician to support their client. Participants will look at both technology-based solutions and partner-based solutions for their clients. Switch access, joystick use, eye-gaze, and head tracking/pointing will be discussed as viable means of access for complex communicators. Participants will see examples and videos of individuals accessing AAC via these methods. Given the ever-evolving nature of technology, participants will look to the future to see what is on the horizon for working with complex communicators and how technology makes accessing communication easier. It is important to note that technology is not always available, required, or a best fit. In these cases, clinicians may need to investigate how to use a robust communication system with parent-assisted scanning or eye-gaze.

Accessibility doesn’t just end at direct vs. indirect access. We must think about our clients’ vision. How can we make sure that their robust system is visually accessible? And if visual accessibility is not possible, or preferred, what can we do to create a tactile-accessible communication system? We will look at available options for both categories, as well as how we can customize what is already in place to help accessibility.

Participants will learn why it is important to look at clients from a holistic perspective, and why they need to consider multi-modal communication when implementing any form of communication with their clients.

Finally, participants will work together with the presenter to brainstorm next steps for their clients. The “WHAT” after you begin implementing an AAC system is always a big question from clinicians. But there is an extra layer required when considering AAC users who may have some accessibility concerns.

Learning objectives:

  • Describe the differences in how direct and in-direct selectors access AAC.
  • Identify at least five different accommodations available when pure direct selection is not ideal for an AAC user.
  • Discuss three ways to incorporate AAC use into your clients everyday environment while dynamically assessing accessibility needs.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64)

3:00 PM – 5:30 PM EDT

Intervention for Bilingual and Multilingual Children

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

This session will be presented live only and will not be recorded for viewing at a later date.

The basic principles of language intervention are the same for monolingual and bilingual children: children need activities that are motivating, that advance their language and that help them communicate more efficiently. However, for multilingual children, many questions arise, notably which language(s) to focus on in therapy, whether to prioritize one language over another, whether to work on the same linguistic structures in both languages, whether treatment gains transfer from one language to the other, how to motivate bilingual children and their families, and how to maximally support the child’s learning in the short and long run.

This lecture will:

  • survey answers to these questions from the research literature and point to concrete ways in which therapy could be planned following the current state of the art.
  • present new research data on an international treatment efficacy study, and international parent interview study and on longitudinal data on the language development of immigrant children in Montreal to present the process of becoming bilingual from the viewpoint of children and their parents.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

3:00 PM – 3:45 PM EDT

Morphological Interventions Delivered by S-LPs and Educators for Kindergarten to Grade Three Students

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Basiliki Passaretti, MA, Reg. CASLPO, S-LP(C), McMaster University; Peter Cahill, MSc., Reg. CASLPO, S-LP(C), McMaster University; Annie Jiang, B.Sc., McMaster University; Tiffany Gallager, PhD, Brock University; Lyn Turkstra, PhD, McMaster University; Wenonah Campbell, PhD, McMaster University.

The ability to read is key to students’ academic success and well-developed morphological skills are an essential component of learning to read. Educators and S-LPs share the responsibility for effective literacy instruction with the combined expertise of the S-LP and educator ideal for language and literacy achievement. S-LP-educator collaboration may be a critical component of morphological interventions implemented in a classroom setting. A scoping review was conducted to describe morphological interventions and S-LP-educator collaborative practices with the specificity required to inform day-to-day practice. Data on the components of morphological interventions delivered in classrooms and S-LP-educator collaborative practices will be presented.

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

3:00 PM – 3:30 PM EDT

Tackling Social Inequalities in Language Development

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Author: Mélissa Di Sante, M.P.O (SLP), Ph.D, Université de Montréal/Centre de recherche en santé publique.

Social inequalities in language development opportunities exist among young children, in Canada as in most countries. Because of their expert knowledge of language development, speech-language pathologists should be involved in the discussions surrounding this important public health issue. This seminar aims to support speech-language pathologists who wish to act on these inequalities, by presenting key concepts and theories drawn from public health and health promotion, understanding how they relate to language development, and how they can guide actions and interventions conducted by speech-language pathologists to better support the language development of children in their communities.

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4)

3:00 PM – 6:30 PM EDT

Traumatic Brain Injury and Vulnerable Populations; An Important Role for Speech-Language Pathology

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is highly prevalent among vulnerable and underserved populations such as those in the criminal justice system, and those who are homeless or unstably housed. In fact, the prevalence of TBI among these populations is a serious public health issue. Not surprisingly, a history of TBI (diagnosed or suspected) precedes their experience of criminal involvement and or homelessness for many. More recently, there is increased awareness of TBI among women survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV). Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, statistics showed that 1 in 4 women would experience IPV in their life-time, however throughout the pandemic, this has increased to 1 in 3. The majority of these individuals have not had access to proper diagnosis, care and rehabilitation.

The communication challenges associated with TBI including cognitive-communication disorders and social communication disorders are often superimposed upon pre-existing language and literacy issues for some of these individuals. Moreover, these communication disorders negatively impact outcomes and community reintegration and can be a factor in recidivism for those who are justice involved.

Speech-language pathologists can play an important role in mitigating these challenges through direct intervention as well as through training of front-line staff.

This presentation will provide opportunities for learning through didactic lecture, video, as well as discussion and audience small group activities.

Learning objectives:

  • Understand the prevalence of traumatic brain injury among vulnerable populations
  • Understand the intersection of psychological trauma in concert with physical and brain trauma
  • Identify the cognitive-communication and social communication impairments that contribute to vulnerability
  • Understand the role of speech-language pathology in assessing and treating these individuals
  • Learn specific strategies and techniques to support these individuals
  • Understand the value and importance of education and training of front-line staff
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

Adult (18-64)

3:45 PM – 4:15 PM EDT

The Modified Token Test: A New Way to Assess Working Memory and Linguistic Skills

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Theresa Pham, University of Western Ontario; Lisa Archibald, PhD, University of Western Ontario.

To process sentences, children use working memory (WM) – the ability to retain and process the sentences – and language knowledge. Speech-language pathologists (S-LPs) therefore need to understand whether WM and/or language weakness underlie poor language performance. The Token Test, wherein sentences vary in length and syntactic complexity, might help S-LPs in practice. We studied the test’s structure and found: (1) a verbal WM component consisted of long (and syntactically consistent) sentences, and (2) a linguistic factor that included syntactically complex sentences. Our modified Token Test is a promising tool that could be used to disentangle WM and linguistic knowledge.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

3:50 PM – 4:35 PM EDT

A Research-School Collaboration to Support Adolescents with Developmental Language Disorder

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors: Chantal Desmarais, Professor, Université Laval; Maude Garant; Véronique Caron; Marie-Ève Lamontagne; Marie-Catherine St-Pierre; Francine Julien-Gauthier

Adolescents with developmental language disorder (AwDLD) face learning and integration challenges in various contexts, including school. Meanwhile, teachers feel insufficiently trained to support AwDLD. This project addresses this gap via a researcher-school co-design implementation of a teacher led and S-LP supported intervention to improve communication and social abilities of AwDLD. The interactive seminar will cover the objectives and the 16 in-class activities as well as the steps of the project from the logic model to the implementation of the intervention. These will be embedded in the general principles of integrated knowledge transfer that served as a framework for the project.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

School Aged (5-17)

4:30 PM – 5:00 PM EDT

Break

 

5:00 PM – 5:45 PM EDT

Assessing Comprehension in Children with Low Speech/Motor Function: Supporting Implementation of the C-BiLLT in Canada

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Jael Bootsma, McMaster University; Kristine Stadskleiv, PhD, University of Oslo; Michelle Phoenix, PhD, McMaster University; Johanna Geytenbeek, PhD, Amsterdam UMC; Jan Willem Gorter, MD, PhD, FRCP(C), Universitair Medisch Centrum Utrecht; Dayle McCauley, MSc, McMaster University; Sara Fiske; University of Oslo; Fiona Campbell, McMaster University; Natasha Crews, Western University; BJ Cunningham, PhD, Western University.

Assessing language comprehension in children with Cerebral Palsy and low motor and speech function is challenging as existing tools require children to speak, point, and manipulate objects. An innovative new tool, the Computer-Based instrument for Low motor Language Testing (C-BiLLT) is now available to addresses this issue by allowing children to respond using access methods that suit their needs. The C-BiLLT is used widely in Europe and was recently validated in Canada by our team. We will give an overview of the C-BiLLT, and present findings from our European study that will be used to support implementation in Canada.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

5:50 PM – 6:35 PM EDT

Indicateurs normatifs du développement du langage en français québécois de 3 à 5,5 ans

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Mélissa Di Sante, Ph.D., Centre de recherche en santé publique (CReSP), Université de Montréal; Audette Sylvestre, Ph.D., Centre interdisciplinaire de recherche en réadaptation et intégration sociale (CIRRIS), Université Laval; Jean Leblond, Ph.D., Centre interdisciplinaire de recherche en réadaptation et intégration sociale (CIRRIS).

L’objectif de cette étude était de présenter des indicateurs normatifs du développement du vocabulaire réceptif et expressif, des composantes phonologiques et morphosyntaxique du langage expressif d’enfants québécois unilingues francophones âgés de 3 à 5,5 ans. Les données ont été collectées auprès de 99 enfants du groupe de comparaison de l’Étude longitudinale sur le langage et la négligence (ELLAN). Les données normatives développées par la présente étude contribuent à l’avancement des connaissances sur le développement typique du langage en français et offre des points de repère indispensables pour le travail clinique et la recherche en orthophonie.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

Saturday

11:00 AM – 5:00 PM EDT

Interventions to Support Children with Developmental Language Disorder

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Developmental Language Disorder (DLD) is a persistent language problem with a significant impact on everyday social interactions or educational progress. In this workshop, we’ll briefly review the criteria and characteristics of DLD, but we’ll spend the majority of the session talking about intervention. We’ll discuss classroom strategies, small group supports, and individual therapies, primarily in the context of school-aged children although the information will be relevant to other ages as well. We’ll also think about intervention design, monitoring outcomes and options for intensifying intervention when needed. This will be an interactive session with ample time for questions and discussion.

Learning objectives:

  • Understand the criteria and characteristics of Developmental Language Disorder
  • Know evidence-based intervention options for children with DLD
  • Have strategies for monitoring and modifying intervention as needed
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

School Aged (5-17)

11:00 AM – 12:30 PM EDT

Assessing Entry-To-Practice: The New Canadian Assessment of Clinical Competence (ACC-SLP/AUD)

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Susan J Wagner, B.Sc. (SPA), M.Sc. (CD), Reg. CASLPO, S-LP(C), University of Toronto; Lu-Anne McFarlane, M.Sc., University of Alberta; Justine Hamilton, M.Cl.Sc., Reg. CASLPO, M.B.A., McMaster University; Lynn Ellwood, B.Sc. (CD), M.H.Sc., Reg. CASLPO, SLP(C), M.B.A., University of Toronto; The Canadian Academic Coordinators/Directors of Clinical Education.

Objectively assessing clinical competence is essential to the quality of speech-language pathology and audiology services. Consequently, regulators, professional associations, accreditors, educational programs, learners, faculty and clinicians are integrating national competency profiles into their systems. Following an overview of key features and concepts related to competency-based education and assessment, this mini-seminar introduces the new Canadian Assessment of Clinical Competence (ACC-SLP/AUD). This national clinical education assessment tool, including milestones or developmental stages of a specific competence, will be explored through student scenarios. Participants will apply competency-based assessment principles using examples from the tool to enable application to their own contexts.

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

11:00 AM – 2:30 PM EDT

Biliteracy Instruction in French Immersion

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

The recording for this live session will be available for viewing until May 27, 2022 only.

The target for this session is school S-LPs seeking to coach teachers to implement evidence-based reading support in the classroom.

Structured instruction in phonological awareness, phoneme-grapheme correspondences, spelling rules and morphological awareness is critical for literacy success (NRP, 2000, Bowers, Kirby & Deacon, 2010). Students enrolled in dual language French immersion programs require this in both English and French, with careful consideration of the relationship between elements of each language (Ballinger, Lyster, Sterzuk & Genesee, 2017). This workshop will map out in detail many proposed evidence-informed scopes and sequences for English and French literacy instruction from Kindergarten to grade 6 and beyond. We will cover the what, why and how of phonological awareness, phoneme-grapheme correspondences, spelling rules, and morphological awareness for classroom instruction. Throughout, opportunities to foster bidirectional transfer across English and French will be highlighted.

Learning objectives:

  • Gain familiarity with robust research evidence pertaining to critical elements of literacy instruction
  • Identify and understand the components and developmental sequence of literacy instruction in English and French
  • Identify key similarities and differences in English versus French phonological awareness, phoneme-grapheme correspondences, spelling rules, and morphological awareness
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

School Aged (5-17)

11:00 AM – 2:30 PM EDT

Inferencing in Narratives

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

This session will be presented live only and will not be recorded for viewing at a later date.

Inferential comprehension is a fundamental ability for the development of social competence, oral language, and reading abilities of children. Moreover, inferencing skills are known to be critical to comprehension across both oral and written contexts and enable the construction of coherent and complete mental representation of messages. This presentation will cover (a) an overview of inferential comprehension development in narratives, (b) inferential comprehension difficulties in young populations (e.g. children with developmental language disorders (DLD), children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), children exposed to neglect), and (c) explore evidence-based interventions in order to foster inferential comprehension in narratives. In this presentation, S-LPs will be invited to reflect about both aspects of assessment and intervention of inferencing in narratives.

Learning objectives:

  • Understand key elements of inferential comprehension development in children aged 6 years and under
  • Explore different assessment tasks that can be used to assess inferencing in narratives
  • Identify potential inferential comprehension difficulties in young populations
  • Reflect on evidence-based interventions in order to foster inferential comprehension in narratives
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

11:00 AM – 1:30 PM EDT

The S-LP’s Role in Long-Term Care: How Can We Create a Clinical Pathway?

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

This session will be presented live only and will not be recorded for viewing at a later date.

Older adults residing in long-term care present with several health challenges – many of which are inextricably linked to dysphagia. Unfortunately, speech-language pathologists are under-utilized in this setting. As such, we need to take an interdisciplinary approach to care to ensure the appropriate referrals are made and resident needs are met. In addition to empowering clinicians to advocate for increased S-LP services in long-term care by outlining a potential care pathway, this session will focus on many of the factors that need to be addressed when we are asked to see residents of long-term care. We will discuss presbyphagia, determining swallowing pathophysiology, feasible intervention options and nutrition. Best practices for screening, assessing, and treating dysphagia will also be covered. Ultimately, attendees will walk away from the session with the information required to advocate for increased S-LP services in long term care, as well as increased knowledge of how to assess and treat dysphagia given the current restrictions imposed on Canadian S-LPs working in long-term care.

Learning objectives:

  • Describe the importance of integrating S-LPs into long-term care settings.
  • Identify two ways S-LPs can help to create a clinical pathway for dysphagia referrals in long-term care.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists

Age Group(s)

Senior (65+)

12:30 PM – 1:00 PM EDT

Break

Sponsored by:

1:00 PM – 2:30 PM EDT

Being and Becoming, Together: A Conversation Between Two Indigenous Early-Learning Professionals and a Pediatric S-LP

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

This session will be presented live only and will not be recorded for viewing at a later date.

Authors:

Janine L. Chesworth, S-LP(C), R-SLP, Doctoral student, Special Education, Educational Psychology, Kehewin Cree Nation/University of Alberta; Elissa Gadwa, Jordan's Principle Program Coordinator, Kehewin Cree Nation; Melissa Paul, Cree Language Teacher, Kehewin Cree Nation

Indigenous communities are gaining increased access to S-LP. Many challenges and critical issues are coming to light at the intersection of these two distinctly different worlds. This discussion amongst two nehiyaw early-learning professionals and one non-Indigenous S-LP explores the experiences of being on the precarious landscape of language revitalization and cultural reclamation in an Indigenous community, moving forward despite systemic confines inherent to health and education. What will be shared? What has evolved in our ongoing process of Indigenizing S-LP practice, and what we are becoming together.

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

1:00 PM – 1:45 PM EDT

Culturally Relevant Assessment for American Sign Language Development

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Author: Charlotte J Enns, PhD, University of Manitoba.

Increasing diversity in the cultural and linguistic backgrounds of deaf children in Canada challenges traditional monolingual approaches to language testing. There is a need to balance the numerous measures available to assess spoken languages with the scarcity of measures to assess signed languages. In this presentation, the development of two standardized tests of American Sign Language (ASL) for use in research and education with children aged 3 – 13 years will be described: 1) the ASL Receptive Skills Test and 2) The ASL Expressive Skills Test. The content, format, procedures, and psychometrics of each of the tests will be outlined.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

School Aged (5-17)

1:50 PM – 2:35 PM EDT

Readiness Support: Promoting Attendance and Engagement in Children's Services

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors: Michelle Phoenix; Gillian King; Sue Simpson; Maya Albin

Missed appointments are a common problem in children’s rehabilitation that may lead to client discharge and limit child outcomes. In this case study, we created, implemented and evaluated the “Readiness Support Program” to help families attend appointments and engage in services. This program includes a clinical care-path implemented by professionals (e.g., speech-language pathologists, social workers). Clinical scripts and centre policies were developed to help identify barriers to service use and devise solutions with families. Statistics, health records, interviews and a measurement tool were used to evaluate the implementation of RSP, barriers to service use, outcome of RSP and recommend changes.

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

2:30 PM – 3:00 PM EDT

Break

Sponsored by:

3:00 PM – 5:00 PM EDT

Planting Two Trees with One Seed: AAC Supports for Challenging Behavior

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

This presentation will introduce evidence-based AAC supports for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or other developmental disabilities who engage in challenging behaviour. Strategies will include functional communication training and choice-making supports.

Learning objectives:

  • Explain the relationship between communication and problem behavior
  • Describe four essential elements of functional communication training (FCT)
  • Describe the use of contingency maps as an adjunct to FCT
  • Give an example of the use of AAC for choice-making as a solution for problem behaviour
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17), Adult (18-64)

3:00 PM – 5:00 PM EDT

Selective Mutism: Practical Strategies for S-LPs

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

The recording for this live session will be available for viewing until May 16, 2022 only.

Selective Mutism is an anxiety disorder affecting approximately 1% of children, with huge effects on their social, emotional, and academic lives. Recent research supports the use of behaviourally-based therapies including techniques such as shaping and fading (e.g., Bergman et al., 2013; Catchpole et al., 2019, Cornacchio et al., 2019). For treatment to be effective, good coordination between school professionals, treating professionals, and parents is needed. Speech-language pathologists are ideally placed to help inform educational professionals about evidence-based treatment and are well qualified to deliver the treatment itself (time permitting). In this practical, engaging workshop, the following will be discussed:

  • an overview of Selective Mutism including comorbidities relevant to S-LPs
  • current evidence-based best practices in assessment and treatment of Selective Mutism
  • a brief overview of treatment components including warm up, encouraging speech, and fading in
  • best practices for coordinating with other team members
  • general 'tips and tricks' from a seasoned practitioner
  • an overview of resources that can be shared with educators and parents alike

The didactic portion of the workshop will be 90 minutes, followed by 30 minutes of “Q&A style” discussion. This workshop will be relevant to S-LPs working in school settings as well as those in private practice.

Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Pre-School (0-4), School Aged (5-17)

3:00 PM – 4:30 PM EDT

The Speech-Language Pathologist (S-LP) Role in Medical Assistance in Dying

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

In June 2016, Canada legalized medical assistance in dying (MAID) as a right and set legal requirements around patient consent and participation. In March 2021 there were amendments to the law and safeguards put into place which allowed access to an assisted death for a broader client population. For patients with communication disorders who lack communication support, access to this right and the ability to fully consent can be limited. At the same time, despite the role of Speech-Language Pathologists (S-LPs) in providing communication supports at end-of-life, there continues to be almost no research or practice guidance around S-LP participation in MAID and limited awareness of the benefits of S-LP contributions to MAID.

Learning objectives:

  • Address the unique role of S-LPs in the MAID process by combining clinical insight from S-LP participation on interdisciplinary MAID teams since 2016 with S-LP best practices on capacity to consent in end-of-life conversations.
  • Address gaps in client care by outlining the S-LP role in MAID, sharing clinical experiences, case studies and practical resources in order for S-LPs to feel more prepared to support a client’s communication during the MAID process.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Students

Age Group(s)

Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

3:00 PM – 4:30 PM EDT

The Usefulness in Use-ful-ness: Clinical Application of Identifying Inflection, Derivation and Compounding in Language Samples

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Author: Dr. Bonita Squires, University of British Columbia, Dalhousie University

Advanced academic vocabulary is largely made up of multi-morphemic words such as geographical, inequality and expressionism. To assess and intervene on vocabulary development, clinicians may consider identifying multi-morphemic words and morphemes that children already produce in language samples.

Learning objectives:

  • Learn about language sampling and the development of different types of morphology.
  • Practice the systematic identification of multi-morphemic words in a real language sample produced by a child who is deaf or hard-of-hearing.
  • Brainstorm ways to use this information in setting goals and developing stimuli for intervention.
Level

Intermediate

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

School Aged (5-17)

3:00 PM – 3:45 PM EDT

What Do People with Parkinson’s Disease Gain from Watching Educational Videos on Communication and Swallowing?

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Marie-Christine Hallé, PhD, École d’orthophonie et d’audiologie, Université de Montréal et CRIR; Ons El Mokhtar, École d’orthophonie et d’audiologie, Université de Montréal et CRIR; Sinead Creagh, Human Communication, Development, and Information Sciences, Faculty of Education, The University of Hong Kong; Édith Coulombe, École d’orthophonie et d’audiologie, Université de Montréal et CRIR; Charline Delorme, École d’orthophonie et d’audiologie, Université de Montréal et CRIR; Ingrid Verduyckt, PhD, École d’orthophonie et d’audiologie, Université de Montréal et CRIR.

Considering the limited access to speech-language therapy services for people with Parkinson’s Disease (PwPD), online educational videos addressing speech and swallowing symptoms and self-management strategies may benefit this patient population. Aiming to evaluate the impact and appreciation of such videos, we invited PwPD to complete an online survey one week before, immediately after, and two-months after watching an educational video on communication or swallowing. Results from the comparison of respondents’ level of knowledge and confidence in self-managing their symptoms at each time point will be presented along with the results from our qualitative analysis of respondents’ impression of the videos.

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)

3:50 PM – 4:35 PM EDT

The Prevalence of Dysphagia: Results from the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging

The language used in the description reflects the language of the session.

Authors:

Rebecca Affoo, PhD, CCC-SLP, SLP-Reg, S-LP(C), Dalhousie University; Bonnie Lam, BSc, McMaster University; Jinhui Ma, PhD, McMaster University; Ashwini Namasivayam-MacDonald, PhD, S-LP(C), CCC-SLP, Reg. CASLPO, McMaster University.

This session will focus on describing results from a secondary cross-sectional analysis of Canadian population-based data to highlight the prevalence of dysphagia in community-dwelling older adults aged 45 years and older at baseline, and then at follow-up approximately three years later. Prevalence of dysphagia will be examined across provinces and key demographic characteristics such as age, sex, race, education, income, and location. The results will be compared with data from other countries. Implications for policy and practice will be discussed.

Level

Introductory

Intended Audience

Speech-Language Pathologists, Communication Health Assistants, Students

Age Group(s)

Adult (18-64), Senior (65+)