Programme quotidien

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Groupe d’âge

Jeudi

7 h 30 – 8 h 00

Petit déjeuner

Vous êtes invités à vous joindre à nous pour le petit déjeuner suivi de la séance inaugurale et du conférencier d’honneur.

8 h 00 – 9 h 00

Séances inaugurales et discours du conférencier d’honneur

Les heures et le contenu sont sujets à changement.

9 h 15 – 12 h 30

Assessment of Children with Speech Sound Disorders: Identification of Sub-Types

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

Children with speech sound disorders produce many more speech sound errors than expected for their age and may be unintelligible. This population of children is known to be heterogenous in underlying etiology, primary psycholinguistic factors, and surface presentation. A detailed assessment helps the S-LP understand the child’s needs and choose the treatment approach that is most likely to be effective.

Learning objectives:

  • Psycholinguistic factors that explain speech sound disorders in different sub-populations of children with severe speech sound disorders;
  • Application of assessment tools for diagnosis and treatment planning;
  • Interpretation of assessment results using case studies representing a phonological processing deficit, a phonological memory impairment, and childhood apraxia of speech; and
  • Suggested treatment approaches for these sub-types of speech sound disorder, based on the research evidence.
Cotation

Intermédiaire

Auditoire cible

Orthophonistes

Groupes d’âge

Les enfants d’âge préscolaire (de 0 à 4 ans), Les enfants d’âge scolaire (de 5 à 17 ans)

9 h 15 – 12 h 30

Autism: Beyond the Male Presentation

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

Males with autism far outnumber females, right? Not so fast. Recent investigations reveal a vast number of girls who are "hiding in plain sight." Furthermore, it may not only be females who are under identified; there is a significant overlap between autistics and queers. Some recommend autism clinics be sensitive to the potential of individuals whose gender is fluid, and they similarly suggest gender identity clinics be informed as to the possibility of autism. Therefore, we may need to heighten our awareness; and possibly cast a wider net in order to be more inclusive in our search for those who need an autism diagnosis.

Some may conclude that identification and support are not needed if in fact they are not being identified, however, that simply is not the case. Many of these individuals actually receive diagnoses, but typically in the psychiatric domain, not the developmental disability realm. Awareness and a correct diagnosis have the potential to prevent prolonged suffering with these individuals.

Learning objectives:

  • Examine the different presentations of autism as a function of gender, with an emphasis on the characteristics that all too often are missed. If these individuals are not identified, condition-specific support cannot be rendered.
Conférencier(s)

Glenis Benson, PhD

Cotation

Intermédiaire

Auditoire cible

Orthophonistes, Aides en santé de la communication, Étudiants

Groupes d’âge

Les enfants d’âge préscolaire (de 0 à 4 ans), Les enfants d’âge scolaire (de 5 à 17 ans), Les adultes (de 18 à 64 ans), Les personnes âgées (65 ans et plus)

9 h 15 – 10 h 45

The Ins and Outs of Private Practice

The language used in the descriptions reflects the language of the sessions.

This presentation will feature three different approaches to running your own private speech-language pathology practice in a panel format.

Learning objectives:

  • Getting started: Is Private Practice for you?
  • Considerations for growth
  • Marketing and social media
  • Networking and building relationships in the community
  • Tips for running an efficient business: scheduling, cancellations and no shows
  • Use of assistants and volunteers
  • Costs (e.g., becoming incorporated, legal fees, other overhead)
  • Documentation and file retention
  • Treatment considerations
  • Where to get support

Following the panel presentation, there will be a question period to support participants in developing a greater understanding of private practice.

Cotation

Préliminaire

Auditoire cible

Orthophonistes

Groupes d’âge

Les enfants d’âge préscolaire (de 0 à 4 ans), Les enfants d’âge scolaire (de 5 à 17 ans), Les adultes (de 18 à 64 ans), Les personnes âgées (65 ans et plus)

10 h 45 – 11 h 00

Pause du matin

Joignez-vous à nous pour des rafraîchissements sur le plancher du salon professionnel et rencontrez les exposants.

12 h 30 – 13 h 30

Dîner dans la salle des exposants

Joignez-vous à nous pour le déjeuner sur le plancher du salon professionnel et rencontrez les exposants.

13 h 30 – 17 h 00

Learn to Play for the S-LP: Taking Knowledge into Practice

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

This session will be based on the fundamentals of the Learn to Play program by Dr. Karen Stagnitti. These fundamental play skills are the foundation of their social and academic success and are an important consideration in any treatment plan of a child with social and language concerns. The course will discuss how to take the knowledge of different types of players and core developmental play skills and apply it to assessment and treatment in a variety of settings with a variety of populations in a fun and functional way.

Learning objectives:

  • Review different types of players and the six core skills of imaginative play.
  • Understand how to assess and interpret results related to language and social skill development for children of all ages, including children with complex developmental delays/disorders.
  • Learn how to take assessment information to develop an effective treatment plan.
  • Learn implementation strategies for early intervention, kindergarten, elementary and high school students.
Cotation

Intermédiaire

Auditoire cible

Orthophonistes

Groupes d’âge

Les enfants d’âge préscolaire (de 0 à 4 ans), Les enfants d’âge scolaire (de 5 à 17 ans)

13 h 30 – 17 h 00

Promoting the Acquisition of Literacy Skills in At-Risk Preschoolers

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

When children enter kindergarten, they are not all equally predisposed to acquire literacy skills at the optimum rate. The risk for delayed acquisition of literacy is higher in two groups of children specifically: those who have received less exposure to pre-literacy experiences, especially in the school language; and those who are at biological risk of slower learning in the literacy domain, especially due to deficits in phonological processing. This session will explore predictors of literacy skills, following children from preschool age through the early school years.

Learning objectives:

  • Approaches to supporting the development of emergent literacy skills in these children will be presented.
  • Strategies that employ direct and indirect teaching and standard and digital materials will be described.
  • The particular risk factors experienced by young boys will be considered.
Cotation

Intermédiaire

Auditoire cible

Orthophonistes, Aides en santé de la communication, Étudiants

Groupes d’âge

Les enfants d’âge scolaire (de 5 à 17 ans)

15 h 00 – 15 h 30

Pause de l’après-midi

Joignez-vous à nous pour des rafraîchissements sur le plancher du salon professionnel et rencontrez les exposants.

17 h 00 – 18 h 00

Réception de bienvenue

Les heures et le contenu sont sujets à changement.

Vendredi

6 h 45 – 7 h 30

Marche/course d’OAC

Avant d’entreprendre votre deuxième journée au congrès, profiter des vues panoramiques de Vancouver avec une randonnée pédestre ou une course à pied avec vos collègues.

8 h 30 – 12 h 00

An Update on Evidence-Based Interventions for Acquired Language Disorders Across the Continuum of Care

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

Following a brief overview of contemporary conceptualizations of aphasia and other acquired language disorders and their management in a variety of healthcare settings, this presentation will critically review recently developed interventions designed to: (a) directly remediate acquired language disorders, common, concomitant extra-linguistic issues, or both, and (b) via compensatory approaches (e.g., communication partner training), indirectly address acquired language disorders, related concomitant impairments, or both.

Learning objectives:

  • Participants will be able to describe recently developed therapy procedures designed to directly address and remediate the linguistic and related concomitant symptoms of adults with aphasia or other acquired language disorders.
  • Participants will be able to describe recently developed therapy procedures designed to compensate for or indirectly address the linguistic and related concomitant symptoms of adults with aphasia or other acquired language disorders.
Conférencier(s)

Laura L. Murray, PhD

Cotation

Intermédiaire

Auditoire cible

Orthophonistes, Étudiants

10 h 00 – 10 h 30

Pause du matin

Joignez-vous à nous pour des rafraîchissements sur le plancher du salon professionnel et rencontrez les exposants.

12 h 00 – 13 h 30

Dîner dans la salle des exposants

Joignez-vous à nous pour le déjeuner sur le plancher du salon professionnel et rencontrez les exposants.

13 h 30 – 17 h 00

Accessing It All: AAC Options for All Learners

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

Deciding what communication system to trial with a client can be a very overwhelming process. Frequent questions such as paper-based or high tech? Dedicated or iPad? If dedicated, what system? If iPad, what app? are asked on a regular basis. The questions are almost endless as clinicians attempt to match specific features with specific clients. Now what happens if the client in question is not a direct selector or requires modifications to access a robust communication system? What options are then available?

A bulk of this presentation will be dedicated towards the different types of access methods that may be required for a clinician to support their client. Participants will look at both technology-based solutions and partner-based solutions for their clients. Switch access, joystick use, eye-gaze, and head tracking/pointing will be discussed as viable means of access for complex communicators. Participants will see examples and videos of individuals accessing AAC via these methods. Given the ever-evolving nature of technology, participants will look to the future to see what is on the horizon for working with complex communicators and how technology makes accessing communication easier. It is important to note that technology is not always available, required, or a best fit. In these cases, clinicians may need to investigate how to use a robust communication system with parent-assisted scanning or eye-gaze.

Accessibility doesn’t just end at direct vs. indirect access. We must think about our clients’ vision. How can we make sure that their robust system is visually accessible? And if visual accessibility is not possible, or preferred, what can we do to create a tactile-accessible communication system? We will look at available options for both categories, as well as how we can customize what is already in place to help accessibility.

Participants will learn why it is important to look at clients from a holistic perspective, and why they need to consider multi-modal communication when implementing any form of communication with their clients.

Finally, participants will work together with the presenter to brainstorm next steps for their clients. The “WHAT” after you begin implementing an AAC system is always a big question from clinicians. But there is an extra layer required when considering AAC users who may have some accessibility concerns.

Learning objectives:

  • Describe the differences in how direct and in-direct selectors access AAC.
  • Identify at least five different accommodations available when pure direct selection is not ideal for an AAC user.
  • Discuss three ways to incorporate AAC use into your clients everyday environment while dynamically assessing accessibility needs.
Cotation

Intermédiaire

Auditoire cible

Orthophonistes, Aides en santé de la communication, Étudiants

13 h 30 – 17 h 00

Intervention for Bilingual and Multilingual Children

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

The basic principles of language intervention are the same for monolingual and bilingual children: children need activities that are motivating, that advance their language and that help them communicate more efficiently. However, for multilingual children, many questions arise, notably which language(s) to focus on in therapy, whether to prioritize one language over another, whether to work on the same linguistic structures in both languages, whether treatment gains transfer from one language to the other, how to motivate bilingual children and their families, and how to maximally support the child’s learning in the short and long run.

This lecture will:

  • survey answers to these questions from the research literature and point to concrete ways in which therapy could be planned following the current state of the art.
  • present new research data on an international treatment efficacy study, and international parent interview study and on longitudinal data on the language development of immigrant children in Montreal to present the process of becoming bilingual from the viewpoint of children and their parents.
Cotation

Intermédiaire

Auditoire cible

Orthophonistes, Aides en santé de la communication, Étudiants

Groupes d’âge

Les enfants d’âge préscolaire (de 0 à 4 ans), Les enfants d’âge scolaire (de 5 à 17 ans)

13 h 30 – 17 h 00

Traumatic Brain Injury and Vulnerable Populations; An Important Role for Speech-Language Pathology

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is highly prevalent among vulnerable and underserved populations such as those in the criminal justice system, and those who are homeless or unstably housed. In fact, the prevalence of TBI among these populations is a serious public health issue. Not surprisingly, a history of TBI (diagnosed or suspected) precedes their experience of criminal involvement and or homelessness for many. More recently, there is increased awareness of TBI among women survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV). Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, statistics showed that 1 in 4 women would experience IPV in their life-time, however throughout the pandemic, this has increased to 1 in 3. The majority of these individuals have not had access to proper diagnosis, care and rehabilitation.

The communication challenges associated with TBI including cognitive-communication disorders and social communication disorders are often superimposed upon pre-existing language and literacy issues for some of these individuals. Moreover, these communication disorders negatively impact outcomes and community reintegration and can be a factor in recidivism for those who are justice involved.

Speech-language pathologists can play an important role in mitigating these challenges through direct intervention as well as through training of front-line staff.

This presentation will provide opportunities for learning through didactic lecture, video, as well as discussion and audience small group activities.

Learning objectives:

  • Understand the prevalence of traumatic brain injury among vulnerable populations
  • Understand the intersection of psychological trauma in concert with physical and brain trauma
  • Identify the cognitive-communication and social communication impairments that contribute to vulnerability
  • Understand the role of speech-language pathology in assessing and treating these individuals
  • Learn specific strategies and techniques to support these individuals
  • Understand the value and importance of education and training of front-line staff
Cotation

Intermédiaire

Auditoire cible

Orthophonistes, Étudiants

Groupes d’âge

Les adultes (de 18 à 64 ans)

15 h 00 – 15 h 30

Pause de l’après-midi

Joignez-vous à nous pour des rafraîchissements sur le plancher du salon professionnel et rencontrez les exposants.

18 h 00 – 20 h 00

Activité sociale

Plus d'informations bientôt disponibles

Samedi

8 h 00 – 15 h 00

Interventions to Support Children with Developmental Language Disorder

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

Developmental Language Disorder (DLD) is a persistent language problem with a significant impact on everyday social interactions or educational progress. In this workshop, we’ll briefly review the criteria and characteristics of DLD, but we’ll spend the majority of the session talking about intervention. We’ll discuss classroom strategies, small group supports, and individual therapies, primarily in the context of school-aged children although the information will be relevant to other ages as well. We’ll also think about intervention design, monitoring outcomes and options for intensifying intervention when needed. This will be an interactive session with ample time for questions and discussion.

Learning objectives:

  • Understand the criteria and characteristics of Developmental Language Disorder
  • Know evidence-based intervention options for children with DLD
  • Have strategies for monitoring and modifying intervention as needed
Conférencier(s)

Lisa Archibald, PhD

Cotation

Intermédiaire

Auditoire cible

Orthophonistes, Aides en santé de la communication, Étudiants

Groupes d’âge

Les enfants d’âge scolaire (de 5 à 17 ans)

8 h 00 – 11 h 15

Biliteracy Instruction in French Immersion

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

The target for this session is school S-LPs seeking to coach teachers to implement evidence-based reading support in the classroom.

Structured instruction in phonological awareness, phoneme-grapheme correspondences, spelling rules and morphological awareness is critical for literacy success (NRP, 2000, Bowers, Kirby & Deacon, 2010). Students enrolled in dual language French immersion programs require this in both English and French, with careful consideration of the relationship between elements of each language (Ballinger, Lyster, Sterzuk & Genesee, 2017). This workshop will map out in detail many proposed evidence-informed scopes and sequences for English and French literacy instruction from Kindergarten to grade 6 and beyond. We will cover the what, why and how of phonological awareness, phoneme-grapheme correspondences, spelling rules, and morphological awareness for classroom instruction. Throughout, opportunities to foster bidirectional transfer across English and French will be highlighted.

Learning objectives:

  • Gain familiarity with robust research evidence pertaining to critical elements of literacy instruction
  • Identify and understand the components and developmental sequence of literacy instruction in English and French
  • Identify key similarities and differences in English versus French phonological awareness, phoneme-grapheme correspondences, spelling rules, and morphological awareness
Cotation

Intermédiaire

Auditoire cible

Orthophonistes, Étudiants

Groupes d’âge

Les enfants d’âge scolaire (de 5 à 17 ans)

8 h 00 – 11 h 15

Inferencing in Narratives

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

Inferential comprehension is a fundamental ability for the development of social competence, oral language, and reading abilities of children. Moreover, inferencing skills are known to be critical to comprehension across both oral and written contexts and enable the construction of coherent and complete mental representation of messages. This presentation will cover (a) an overview of inferential comprehension development in narratives, (b) inferential comprehension difficulties in young populations (e.g. children with developmental language disorders (DLD), children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), children exposed to neglect), and (c) explore evidence-based interventions in order to foster inferential comprehension in narratives. In this presentation, S-LPs will be invited to reflect about both aspects of assessment and intervention of inferencing in narratives.

Learning objectives:

  • Understand key elements of inferential comprehension development in children aged 6 years and under
  • Explore different assessment tasks that can be used to assess inferencing in narratives
  • Identify potential inferential comprehension difficulties in young populations
  • Reflect on evidence-based interventions in order to foster inferential comprehension in narratives
Cotation

Intermédiaire

Auditoire cible

Orthophonistes, Aides en santé de la communication, Étudiants

Groupes d’âge

Les enfants d’âge préscolaire (de 0 à 4 ans), Les enfants d’âge scolaire (de 5 à 17 ans)

8 h 00 – 11 h 15

The S-LP’s Role in Long-Term Care: How Can We Create a Clinical Pathway?

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

Older adults residing in long-term care present with several health challenges – many of which are inextricably linked to dysphagia. Unfortunately, speech-language pathologists are under-utilized in this setting. As such, we need to take an interdisciplinary approach to care to ensure the appropriate referrals are made and resident needs are met. In addition to empowering clinicians to advocate for increased S-LP services in long-term care by outlining a potential care pathway, this session will focus on many of the factors that need to be addressed when we are asked to see residents of long-term care. We will discuss presbyphagia, determining swallowing pathophysiology, feasible intervention options and nutrition. Best practices for screening, assessing, and treating dysphagia will also be covered. Ultimately, attendees will walk away from the session with the information required to advocate for increased S-LP services in long term care, as well as increased knowledge of how to assess and treat dysphagia given the current restrictions imposed on Canadian S-LPs working in long-term care.

Learning objectives:

  • Describe the importance of integrating S-LPs into long-term care settings.
  • Identify two ways S-LPs can help to create a clinical pathway for dysphagia referrals in long-term care.
Cotation

Intermédiaire

Auditoire cible

Orthophonistes

9 h 30 – 9 h 45

Pause du matin

Joignez-vous à nous pour des rafraîchissements.

12 h 00 – 13 h 30

Déjeuner

Joignez-vous à nous pour le déjeuner.

13 h 00 – 15 h 00

Planting Two Trees with One Seed: AAC Supports for Challenging Behavior

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

This presentation will introduce evidence-based AAC supports for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or other developmental disabilities who engage in challenging behaviour. Strategies will include functional communication training and choice-making supports.

Learning objectives:

  • Explain the relationship between communication and problem behavior
  • Describe four essential elements of functional communication training (FCT)
  • Describe the use of contingency maps as an adjunct to FCT
  • Give an example of the use of AAC for choice-making as a solution for problem behaviour
Conférencier(s)

Pat Mirenda, PhD, BCBA-D

Cotation

Intermédiaire

Auditoire cible

Orthophonistes, Aides en santé de la communication, Étudiants

Groupes d’âge

Les enfants d’âge préscolaire (de 0 à 4 ans), Les enfants d’âge scolaire (de 5 à 17 ans), Les adultes (de 18 à 64 ans)

13 h 00 – 15 h 00

Selective Mutism: How to Identify and Treat!

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

Selective Mutism is a rare disorder affecting 1% of children. In this presentation, we will review how to identify this disorder, its etiology and longitudinal course, and current evidence based treatment recommendations to help children struggling with Selective Mutism. This presentation will include some hands on practice opportunities for participants as well as resources to best support families.

Learning objectives:

  • How to identify Selective Mutism and its causes.
  • How to treat Selective Mutism in the community.
  • When to seek specialized help and what resources are out there.
Cotation

Intermédiaire

Auditoire cible

Orthophonistes

Groupes d’âge

Les enfants d’âge préscolaire (de 0 à 4 ans), Les enfants d’âge scolaire (de 5 à 17 ans)

13 h 00 – 15 h 00

The Speech-Language Pathologist (S-LP) Role in Medical Assistance in Dying

La langue utilisée dans la description reflète la langue de la séance.

In June 2016, Canada legalized medical assistance in dying (MAID) as a right and set legal requirements around patient consent and participation. In March 2021 there were amendments to the law and safeguards put into place which allowed access to an assisted death for a broader client population. For patients with communication disorders who lack communication support, access to this right and the ability to fully consent can be limited. At the same time, despite the role of Speech-Language Pathologists (S-LPs) in providing communication supports at end-of-life, there continues to be almost no research or practice guidance around S-LP participation in MAID and limited awareness of the benefits of S-LP contributions to MAID.

Learning objectives:

  • Address the unique role of S-LPs in the MAID process by combining clinical insight from S-LP participation on interdisciplinary MAID teams since 2016 with S-LP best practices on capacity to consent in end-of-life conversations.
  • Address gaps in client care by outlining the S-LP role in MAID, sharing clinical experiences, case studies and practical resources in order for S-LPs to feel more prepared to support a client’s communication during the MAID process.
Cotation

Intermédiaire

Auditoire cible

Orthophonistes, Étudiants

Groupes d’âge

Les adultes (de 18 à 64 ans), Les personnes âgées (65 ans et plus)