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AAC Assessments with Limited Speech/Motor Skills: What Tools Should We Use?

AAC promotes communication for children with neurodevelopmental disabilities who have limited speech and motor abilities. Prescription necessitates thorough assessment of the individual who requires AAC, their environment, and communication partners; however, many assessments require verbal or fine motor responses. Our review identified 167 assessment methods, many of which required modifications or were not possible for children with limited speech and motor abilities. Findings were categorized using the Participation Model of AAC to support clinicians in planning comprehensive assessments for this special population. A clinical resource outlining the identified tools will be available to participants.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Communication Health Assistants
  • Students

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4)
  • School-aged (5-17)

Level: Introductory

An Exploration of the Experiences of S-LPs Working with Clients with FASD

This presentation provides the results of a qualitative study that explored the experiences of S-LPs in providing management to clients with FASD. Thematic analysis of the experiences of eight S-LPs was conducted. The presentation will explore the importance of person-centered care and the need for collaborative care with other members of the team. It will also outline the generalizable skills that S-LPs have to provide evidence-based practice in the management of clients with FASD.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Communication Health Assistants
  • Students

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4)
  • School-aged (5-17)
  • Adult (18-64)

Level: Introductory

Are We Targeting the Outcomes Caregivers Value?

Caregiver-mediated programs are commonly used by speech-language pathologists to support young autistic children. These programs have been assessed quantitatively for outcomes identified as important by researchers. Our study engaged caregivers using qualitative methods to understand their experiences participating in the virtual More Than Words program and the outcomes they viewed as important for both themselves and their children. This presentation explores caregivers’ views, how they may differ from the outcomes commonly assessed by speech-language pathologists, and how they fit within International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framework. Considerations for meaningful goal selection will be discussed.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Communication Health Assistants
  • Students

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4)

Level: Introductory

Presenter

Auditory Verbal Therapy Approach Training in the Ontario IH Program

The Ontario Infant Hearing program was designed to identify permanent hearing loss (PHL) in children as early as possible, fit amplification, and support entry into early intervention programs.

CHEO was contracted to provide training to S-LPs in the AVT-Approach, by which a child can learn language through listening. The purpose was to increase SLP’s competency and comfort working with children with PHL. Training was made available to all PSL Regions.

Feedback from trainees was collected with questionnaires and interviews. This poster will present an evaluation of the benefits and challenges of the program.

Topic for:

  • Audiology
  • Speech-Language Pathology

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4)

Level: Introductory

Presenter

Biliterate Adolescents' Writing Skills in a Two-Majority Language Context

Studies on biliteracy in adolescents generally report better writing skills in the language of instruction. However, those studies often examine the combination of a majority L2 and a minority heritage L1. This presentation explores the writing skills of bilingual adolescents in their two majority-status languages (French L2 and English L1) asking whether their writing skills compare to those of monolinguals given similar school exposure to French. It also examines how comparable their literacy skills are in both their languages. The image description texts written in French and English were analyzed using syntactic measures, productivity, accuracy and text content quality.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Communication Health Assistants
  • Students

Age Group:

  • School-aged (5-17)

Level: Intermediate

Client Perspectives on Communication Access

The Ontario Infant Hearing program was designed to identify permanent hearing loss (PHL) in children as early as possible, fit amplification, and support entry into early intervention programs.

CHEO was contracted to provide training to S-LPs in the AVT-Approach, by which a child can learn language through listening. The purpose was to increase S-LP’s competency and comfort working with children with PHL. Training was made available to all PSL Regions.

Feedback from trainees was collected with questionnaires and interviews. This poster will present an evaluation of the benefits and challenges of the program.

Topic for:

  • Audiology
  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Communication Health Assistants
  • Students

Age Group:

  • School-aged (5-17)
  • Adult (18-64)
  • Senior (65+)

Level: Introductory

Collaborative Care: Enhancing Access to Autism Assessment through Speech-Language Pathology

As the British Columbia Autism Assessment Network (BCAAN) aims to reduce waitlist for autism assessments, and to provide more timely care for children, youth and families, S-LPs are essential resource who can contribute to high-quality, timely care. BCAAN is undertaking two pilots, which will allow S-LPs to refer directly to BCAAN, and which will allow S-LPs to collaborate with pediatricians to complete assessments. Together, this reimagining of the role of S-LPs will allow children to receive a BCAAN referral sooner, and will contribute to increased capacity for BCAAN assessments, and therefore decreased wait times.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Students

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4)

Level: Intermediate

Communication in Children with Complex Tourette Syndrome

Children with Complex Tourette syndrome (C-TS) are more likely to have language disorders compared to the general population. They may struggle in specific areas of language and communication, yet there is little research to guide clinicians in working with this population. This scaffolded, mixed methods case study looked at language skills and day-to-day communication functioning in five children with C-TS between 8-11 years old, integrating language testing, structured questionnaires, parent diaries and in-depth interviews. Results outline language testing profiles and provide insight into supports/strategies and challenges in learning, home life, and peer relationships.

Topic for:

  • Audiology
  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Communication Health Assistants
  • Students

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4)
  • School-aged (5-17)

Level: Intermediate

Culturally Safe Early Intervention for Deaf & Hard of Hearing Children in BC

We will report findings of a study exploring perspectives on culturally safe delivery of early intervention services for d/Deaf and hard of hearing children in BC. Results will reflect the experiences of a wide range of families and service providers. In line with the research goals, the findings will address characteristics of culturally safe services, and barriers and facilitators to providing such services. Our focus will be on implications to paediatric d/Deaf and hard of hearing services and future research. These findings could guide S-LPs and Audiologists across Canada develop frameworks for culturally safe specialized services in their sites.

Topic for:

  • Audiology
  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Communication Health Assistants
  • Students

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4)

Level: Introductory

Developing a Virtual Community of Practice (VCoP) for Clinical Educators

The lack of resources for preparing clinicians for their role as Clinical Educators has been well-documented in the literature. In response to the issue, the Academic Coordinators of Clinical Education at the University of British Columbia’s School of Audiology and Speech Sciences have developed a Virtual Community of Practice (VCoP) to support the continuing professional development of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology Clinical Educators (CEs) across British Columbia. This presentation will describe the development and evolution of the VCoP, the lessons learned from the journey so far, and will outline plans for the future of our Clinical Educator community.

Topic for:

  • Audiology
  • Speech-Language Pathology

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4)
  • School-aged (5-17)
  • Adult (18-64)
  • Senior (65+)

Level: Intermediate

Developing Professional Identity in Speech-Language Pathology Students

Reflective practice is an important professional competency for Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology clinicians at all levels of experience. Students in graduate level programs routinely complete written reflections as growing personal insight and clinical judgement develops, but ‘reflection fatigue’ is also common with the overuse of this approach. This study critically assesses the effectiveness of written reflections in supporting students’ professional identity and confidence by surveying and interviewing new speech-language pathology graduates of the UBC MSc program. Findings will identify factors that facilitate professional identity and confidence as well as provide a teaching guide for clinical educators and mentors employing reflective approaches.

Topic for:

  • Audiology
  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Students

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4)
  • School-aged (5-17)
  • Adult (18-64)
  • Senior (65+)

Level: Introductory

Developmental Trajectories of Language in Neglected Children

Children in situations of neglect are at high risk of language difficulties. The Early Longitudinal Language and Neglect (ELLAN – Étude longitudinale sur le langage et la négligence) study established the developmental trajectories of receptive and expressive vocabulary, morphosyntax, and speech sounds in neglected preschool children and compared them to those of non-neglected children. The developmental trajectories of some children exposed to neglect are similar to those of their non-neglected peers, while a significant proportion of neglected children experience significant difficulties in several language components.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Students

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4)

Level: Introductory

Développement langagier des enfants préscolaires en contexte minoritaire

Promouvoir le bilinguisme chez les enfants dans des contextes linguistiques minoritaires nécessite une exposition d’au moins 40% du temps à la langue. L’identification des troubles du langage chez ces minorités francophones est complexe en raison de la coexistence de plusieurs langues. Une étude menée avec 11 garderies a développé quatre profils langagiers pour les enfants préscolaires basés sur leur exposition au français et la présence de troubles du langage. Les données de 173 enfants ont été évaluées à l’aide du Language Use Inventory. Les résultats confirment l’importance d’apporter des changements organisationnels dans les services de garde pour atteindre ces objectifs.

Sujet pour :

  • Orthophonie
  • Aides en santé de la communication
  • Étudiants

Groupe d’âge :

  • Les enfants d’âge préscolaire (de 0 à 4 ans)

Cotation de la présentation : Intermédiaire

Diagnostic Accuracy of the ADOS-2 in Children with Psychiatric Conditions

The Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-2 (ADOS-2) shows excellent diagnostic accuracy when used with children suspected of having either autism or language/intellectual delays; however, accuracy has been lower in children with psychiatric conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of the ADOS-2 in pediatric psychiatry patients and to explore factors related to misclassification. Sensitivity of the ADOS-2 was 93% and specificity was 58%. Positive and negative predictive values were 71% and 89%, respectively. Thus, a negative result on the ADOS-2 was more informative than a positive result.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Students

Age Group:

  • School-aged (5-17)

Level: Intermediate

Presenter

Discrimination Indicators of Conversation Skills in Children with DLD

The purpose of this study is to compare whether there are significant differences in the performance of various indicators of discourse organization among children with developmental language disorder (DLD) and typical development from 7-9 years old. There were 35 subjects in this study, including 15 children with DLD and 20 children with typical development. Picture cards and board game are used as materials to collect conversational samples from the children. Results indicated that children with DLD perform significantly different in discourse organization, including topic initiation, maintenance, conversation breakdown, and topic termination. Top five indicators distinguishing children’s conversational abilities are discussed in research.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Communication Health Assistants
  • Students

Age Group:

  • School-aged (5-17)

Level: Advanced

Does Consistent Symbol Location Improve Learning for Autistic AAC Users?

Approximately 30% of autistic children will develop none or little spoken language. It is critical that this subgroup receive effective interventions to support their communication using Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC). A consistent symbol layout (CSL) is a type of display whereby the icons on an AAC system remain in a static position. Despite the number of apps and communication boards who use CSL, there exists little empirical evidence supporting its application with AAC users. We tested the effectiveness of an AAC intervention that used CSL against a well-established intervention that does not use CSL, Picture Exchange Communication System (modified-PECS).

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Communication Health Assistants
  • Students

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4)
  • School-aged (5-17) 

Level: Intermediate

Early Attachment and the Development of Social Communication

The early attachment relationship, between an infant and their primary caregiver(s), drives the development of social communication competence. This relationship, however, is often overlooked within the scope of SLP practice in the Canadian context. This presentation will offer a conceptual framework for social communication, applying a neurodevelopmental and neuropsychological perspective. Attendees will gain an understanding of how the early attachment relationship influences the development of the foundational components of social communication, namely:

  1. socio-cognitive;
  2. socio-emotional; and
  3. socio-linguistic skills

with direct application to clinical practice.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4)
  • School-aged (5-17)

Level: Intermediate

Early Support for GLP: An Evaluation of a Parent Education Workshop

As a response to an increased recognition of delayed echolalia in preschool children, Grandview Kids Speech-Language Pathologists developed an evidence-informed parent workshop focused on Gestalt Language Processing (GLP). Following one-year of implementation, an outcome evaluation identified a change to parent knowledge, awareness, and self-efficacy in supporting their children’s language development. This presentation describes the workshop development and initial outcomes. It highlights the need for further outcome evaluation and for the development of a validated outcome measure sensitive to GLP. This work informs a national dialogue on echolalia and GLP as an emerging priority in early language acquisition.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Communication Health Assistants
  • Students

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4)

Level: Intermediate

Emploi de l’étiquette du TDL par les orthophonistes en contexte minoritaire

Cette étude a examiné pour la première fois l’utilisation du terme « trouble développemental du langage » par les orthophonistes francophones travaillant avec des enfants issus de contexte linguistique minoritaire. Quatre-vingt-six orthophonistes ont participé à l’étude, et les résultats montrent que 73,3 % des orthophonistes interrogés utilisent ce terme. Les participants ont identifié plusieurs obstacles, tels que le besoin de formation et de sensibilisation sur le diagnostic et l’utilisation de ce terme, ainsi que le manque de ressources matérielles et humaines. Quatre recommandations émanent de l’étude pour augmenter l’utilisation du terme et améliorer l’évaluation du langage dans les contextes linguistiques minoritaires.

Sujet pour :

  • Orthophonie
  • Aides en santé de la communication
  • Étudiants

Groupe d’âge :

  • Les enfants d’âge préscolaire (de 0 à 4 ans)
  • Les enfants d’âge scolaire (de 5 à 17 ans)

Cotation de la présentation : Intermédiaire

Engagement in Clinical Supervision: Is Professional Stewardship Enough?

Successful completion of graduate training in SLP and Audiology requires timely access to community placements. The sustainability of clinical placements in community-based settings is a pressing issue. Across Canadian Communication Sciences and Disorders programs, enrollment increases, and program expansion, have brought this issue to the forefront. To address this issue regionally, a clearer understanding of factors influencing clinical education engagement was pursued. Preceptors affiliated with Western University were surveyed to identify facilitators and barriers to clinical supervision. Attendees will develop an awareness of various factors influencing clinical supervision engagement which will be described using a theoretical framework of behaviour change.

Topic for:

  • Audiology
  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Students

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4)
  • School-aged (5-17)
  • Adult (18-64)
  • Senior (65+)

Level: Introductory

Engaging End Users to Develop Gender Affirming Voice/Communication Training

Transgender individuals indicate that their voices are essential to their identity and that their quality of life and emotional well-being is negatively impacted when their voices do not portray their gender. Gender diverse teens do not currently have access to critical services in gender-affirming voice and communication training. Our team engaged gender diverse teens, speech-language pathology students, and experienced S-LPs to develop a framework for a S-LP-led gender affirming voice and communication training program for teens, that integrates an important community service, research, and experiential learning opportunities. The generative co-design process and the findings of the focus groups will be shared.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Communication Health Assistants 
  • Students

Age Group:

  • School-aged (5-17) 
  • Adult (18-64) 
  • Senior (65+)

Level: Introductory

Exploring Canadian S-LPs' Perspectives on Integrating AI as a Clinical Tool

This study investigates the readiness and acceptance of Artificial Intelligence (AI) among S-LPs in the context of assessment/treatment of communication disorders. A diverse sample of 217 S-LPs from across Canada participated in an online survey with 53 questions, revealing that 73% are willing to use or are already using AI in their clinical practice, while 27% express hesitancy. Notably, age correlates with social influence, trust, and behavioral control, with younger S-LPs more open to AI. These findings underscore a growing openness to AI integration in speech-language pathology, emphasizing the importance of considering age-related attitudes and motivations for successful implementation.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4)
  • School-aged (5-17)

Level: Intermediate

Exploring In-Class Modelling to Provide Professional Development in Schools

School-based S-LPs are in a changing paradigm of practice where they are expected to be actively involved in inclusive practices, which may include providing professional development to teachers. Coaching is considered the gold standard for this, although it presents many implementation challenges. This presentation will introduce an alternative to coaching: in-class modelling, which may be less complex to implement in some school settings. The results of two studies that explored in-class modelling will be presented. The findings will support school-based S-LPs in better understanding how in-class modelling can enhance teachers’ practices in language-rich activities.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Students

Age Group:

  • School-aged (5-17) 
  • Adult (18-64)

Level: Introductory

Exploring the S-LP Role in CAR T and BITE Cancer Therapies

Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell therapy (CAR T) and Bi-Specific T Cell Engager (BITE) therapy are new T cell enhancing therapies currently approved by Health Canada for various types of lymphomas with a promising rate of complete remission. Immune Effector Cell-Associated Neurotoxicity (ICANS) is a side effect experienced by 20-60% of patients undergoing these kinds of therapies where neurological side effects such as expressive and receptive aphasia, agraphia, echolalia, and cognitive concerns commonly occur. Though these side effects are temporary and frequently fluctuant, S-LPs play an important role in staff and family education for assessment and management of these neurotoxicities.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology

Age Group:

  • Adult (18-64) 
  • Senior (65+)

Level: Introductory

Feeling Excluded in Financial Environments: Challenges and Strategies to Promote Social Participation for Adults with Post-Stroke Communication Disabilities

People with post-stroke communication disabilities may have social participation challenges, which can include challenges in financial environments. Participation in financial environments influences one’s ability to meet their financial needs. We explored the experiences of four people with post-stroke communication disabilities in financial environments. We used a qualitative design, semi-structured interviews, and a thematic analysis approach. The results demonstrated the experienced challenges are prominently related to external factors like social contexts that did not support communication disabilities and led to financial exclusion. Speech-language pathologists should acknowledge the environment’s role when providing services and education to people with communication disabilities.

Topic for:

  • Students

Age Group:

  • Adult (18-64)

Level: Intermediate

Presenter

How Do Activities Settings Influence Educators-Preschoolers' Conversations?

Early childhood educators can facilitate language development by engaging in conversations with preschoolers. The aim of this study is to describe educators’ talk during three activities: snack time, group chat, and shared book reading. Conversations between early childhood educators and preschoolers were analyzed in regard to features that promote language development in preschoolers, such as complex syntax, decontextualized discourse, and extended conversations. This presentation will give speech-language pathologists a better understanding of how activities influence educators’ talk. This new knowledge will help them provide educators with applicable advice that is consistent with what naturally occurs during a certain activity.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Communication Health Assistants 
  • Students

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4)

Level: Introductory

Increasing Communication Accessibility for People with Aphasia

Communication access is a human right, yet many individuals with communication impairments face challenges accessing their environments. This study investigated communication access in the retail/service industry, as perceived by people with aphasia (PWA) and business owners/managers. Nine PWA were interviewed about their experiences accessing retail businesses/services. Interviews were coded, thematically analyzed, and compared with business owner/manager focus group findings to identify key themes related to barriers and facilitators to communication during business interactions:

  1. aphasia awareness and education;
  2. communication supports; and
  3. respect for PWA.

PWA identified tangible ways that retail businesses can be made more communicatively accessible.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Communication Health Assistants 
  • Students

Age Group:

  • Adult (18-64)

Level: Introductory

Integrating Social Care into Paediatric Speech-Language Pathology Services

This paper presents a way for S-LPs to play an important part in tackling health inequalities. It outlines how SLPs can integrate the social determinants of health into routine clinical practice to achieve “a better and more sustainable future for all” (United Nations, 2015) by reporting the need, feasibility, and acceptability of a systematic, universal, unmet social needs identification and referral pathway in an urban Australian pediatric speech-language pathology community outpatient service. Results indicated that it was possible for S-LPs to incorporate an unmet social needs identification and referral pathway into routine clinical intake practice.

Topic for:

  • Audiology 
  • Speech-Language Pathology 
  • Students

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4)
  • School-aged (5-17)

Level: Introductory

Interactive and Linguistic Input Quality in Context of Child Neglect

The disruptions of parent-child interactions that typically occur in the context of neglect –the most frequent form of maltreatment towards children- may compromise the interactive and linguistic quality of the input that children are exposed to. Yet, few studies have characterized these aspects of children’s language learning environments. Data from the ELLAN study allowed inter-group comparisons of the interactive quality and linguistic input between parent-child dyads in the context of neglect and those from the general population. They reveal salient differences that may support the prevention and intervention efforts of early childhood practitioners to promote early language learning opportunities.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Students

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4)

Level: Intermediate

Kaufman Speech to Language Protocol for Childhood Apraxia of Speech

We report on the effectiveness of the Kaufman Speech to Language Protocol (K-SLP) children with Childhood Apraxia of Speech. Children were recruited from the Carruth Center in Houston, Texas and received three weeks of intensive K-SLP intervention in dyads. Single subject experimental design with multiple-baselines across behaviors was replicated across the small group of six children with CAS. One participant was excluded from the study after signing consent as they did not meet inclusion criteria on follow-up. Overall, four of five participants demonstrated clinically significant changes. The study provides preliminary support for effectiveness of the K-SLP program delivered in dyads.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Communication Health Assistants 
  • Students

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4) 
  • School-aged (5-17)

Level: Introductory

Présentatrice

La tâche de description d'images selon la langue chez des adultes bilingues

La description d’image est une tâche fréquemment utilisée par les orthophonistes pour l’évaluation du discours. La performance à cette tâche varie selon l’éducation et l’âge, cependant, peu d’études ont examiné l’effet de la langue utilisée chez les individus bilingues. L’objectif de cette étude est de comparer les performances en français et en anglais d’adultes neurotypiques bilingues à la tâche de description d’image. Les descriptions d’images ont été transcrites et analysées à l’aide du programme CLAN. L’interprétation des résultats sera discutée en fonction de la langue utilisée. Cette étude souligne l’effet du bilinguisme sur l’analyse du discours oral.

Sujet pour :

  • Orthophonie
  • Aides en santé de la communication

Groupe d’âge :

  • Les adultes (de 18 à 64 ans)  
  • Les personnes âgées (65 ans et plus)

Cotation de la présentation : Introductif

Meeting the Communication Needs of People with Primary Progressive Aphasia

The primary progressive aphasias (PPAs), language-led dementias, are characterized by progressive language impairments. Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) are integral members of the care team. The provision of person centred communication care for this population necessitates understanding their communication needs and avenues of meeting these needs. This three-part investigation sought the perspectives of 29 key stakeholders (seven people with PPA, eight family members, and 14 SLPs) on the communication needs of people with PPA and how these needs could be met. Eight broad areas of communication need were revealed. Multiple avenues of meeting the communication needs of this population were identified.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Communication Health Assistants
  • Students

Age Group:

  • Adult (18-64)
  • Senior (65+)

Level: Introductory

Oropharyngeal Dysphagia Prevalence in Canadian Adult Inpatients

S-LPs are frequently involved in the assessment and management of oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD) in hospitalized adults, but the prevalence of OD in Canadian hospital populations is understudied. This presentation will report the results of an in-progress investigation into the prevalence of OD and nature of S-LP involvement among hospitalized adults in a Greater Toronto Area community hospital system. Over six weeks, all inpatients seen by the speech-language pathology service were enrolled, followed by chart review of all S-LP visits, providing insights into prevalence of OD, associated health factors and health outcomes, and nature of S-LP involvement.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology

Age Group:

  • Adult (18-64) 
  • Senior (65+)

Level: Intermediate

Outcomes from an Adapted Virtual Intensive Comprehensive Aphasia Program

Intensive Comprehensive Aphasia Programs (ICAPs) have shown positive outcomes for people with aphasia (PWA), yet are resource intensive, financially inaccessible, and difficult to implement. Offering modified ICAPs through university clinics is one way to address these challenges. This study explored communication and quality of life outcomes in PWA following participation in an adapted virtual ICAP. Fourteen PWA participated in virtual programs delivered by speech-language pathology student clinicians. Most participants demonstrated improvement across outcome measures and reported high satisfaction with the program. An adapted virtual ICAP is a feasible option to provide programming in a cost-effective manner within a short time frame.

Topic for:

  • Students

Age Group:

  • Adult (18-64)

Level: Intermediate

Parents' Experiences of Assessment: A Scoping Review

In this presentation, we will discuss the results of a scoping literature review of the research on parents’ experiences with speech-language pathology assessment for their preschool children. The results will focus on  literature related to speech-language pathology assessment;  and explore research in related areas to identify approaches for future research. Clinical implications will also be discussed. By the end of the session, participants will have an understanding of the scope of the research on parents’ experiences with speech-language pathology assessment for preschool children, and be encouraged to reflect on their own assessment practices.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4)

Level: Introductory

Pediatric Dysphagia Service Provision in Canada: a Survey of Canadian S-LPs

Our study used survey methodology to capture current speech-language pathology practice specific to pediatric dysphagia within Canada. We identify consistent practice patterns within screening, assessment and intervention and discuss several barriers to practicing in pediatric dysphagia. We also discuss the need for continued advocacy for S-LPs practicing in pediatric dysphagia and the need for clear best practice guidelines and curriculum standards.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Students

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4) 
  • School-aged (5-17) 
  • Adult (18-64)

Level: Intermediate

Perception d’orthophonistes scolaires au palier 1 d'intervention

Our study used survey methodology to capture current speech-language pathology practice specific to pediatric dysphagia within Canada. We identify consistent practice patterns within screening, assessment and intervention and discuss several barriers to practicing in pediatric dysphagia. We also discuss the need for continued advocacy for S-LPs practicing in pediatric dysphagia and the need for clear best practice guidelines and curriculum standards.

Sujet pour :

  • Orthophonie 
  • Aides en santé de la communication 
  • Étudiants

Groupe d’âge :

  • Les enfants d’âge scolaire (de 5 à 17 ans)

Cotation de la présentation : Intermédiaire

Perspectives on an Intensive Aphasia Intervention with Brain Stimulation

Aphasia therapy combined with non-invasive brain stimulation is a promising intervention, yet factors influencing its effectiveness remain unclear. This qualitative descriptive study within the REMAP clinical trial examined different perspectives on drivers impacting intervention outcomes. We interviewed 18 participants, 13 care partners, and 13 providers, thematically analyzing results across groups. Elements influencing perceived intervention success are highlighted in four themes:

  1. motivation to improve;
  2. value of practice and routine;
  3. benefit of a group; and
  4. trust in the intervention.

Offering intensive, group-based therapy to motivated patients who believe in the treatment are important considerations with aphasia treatment planning.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Communication Health Assistants 
  • Students 

Age Group:

  • Adult (18-64) 
  • Senior (65+)

Level: Intermediate

Picture Description Task: Comparing Bilingual and Monolingual Adults

Language assessment in bilingual adults is a complex process. In a minority context, bilingual individuals are often assessed in English due to a limited access to bilingual speech-language pathologists. However, bilingual and monolingual adults perform differently on language assessments.  

The aim of this study was to compare the performance of bilingual and monolingual adults on the picture description task in English. Three pictures were described in English by 30 bilinguals and 30 monolinguals. Transcriptions were analyzed using the program CLAN. The results and their interpretation will be discussed. This study highlights the importance of assessing bilingual adults in both languages.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Communication Health Assistants

Age Group:

  • Adult (18-64) 
  • Senior (65+)

Level: Introductory

Planning and Programming: When Do I Screen My CAS Clients for DCD?

Research on Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) and Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD) is limited; early results suggest evaluating children with CAS for DCD (Duchow et al., 2019). This study replicated Duchow et al. (2019) in a larger population and geographical area. Across Alberta, children with suspected CAS (sCAS) were screened for DCD; demographic and clinical observations were collected. Results indicate that sCAS poses a greater risk for DCD. Exploratory analyses describe other contributors to CAS and DCD. Mechanisms of motor control underlying speech and coordination and management of CAS within a multi-disciplinary approach are discussed.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4)
  • School-aged (5-17)

Level: Advanced

Promoting Early Language in Local Territories through Intersectoral Action

Intersectoral action (ISA) is a recommended strategy for increasing the availability of and access to language-oriented resources in local communities. This has the potential to decrease language inequalities among children. Yet, we rarely talk about ISA the field of speech-language pathology. This presentation will share the results of a case study documenting the process of a local intersectoral initiative aimed at promoting the language development of preschool-aged children in Montréal. By identifying effective practices of local ISA, this presentation can guide speech-language pathologists in early childhood who wish to act on resources for language development in their local areas.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology
  • Students 

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4)

Level: Introductory

Real-World Evaluation of Hearing Aid Technology Preference with EMA

Real-world assessment tools are emerging in audiology as a way of investigating listeners’ hearing aid experiences outside of clinical scenarios. One tool that can be used to capture real-world experiences is Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA). This poster describes the use of EMA with adult hearing aid users in socially motivated real-world environments. Findings present trends in listening program preferences associated with hearing aid technology level and the potential for EMA to support clinical decision-making.

Topic for:

  • Audiology

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4) 
  • School-aged (5-17) 
  • Adult (18-64) 
  • Senior (65+)

Level: Introductory

Roles of Audiologists & Speech-Language Pathologists in Primary Care Teams

This poster presentation will present the results from a scoping review of the literature examining the roles of audiologists and speech-language pathologists within interprofessional primary health care teams. The results of this scoping review will identify the roles of audiologists and speech-language pathologists operating within comprehensive interprofessional primary care (CIPC) teams, and reveal collaboration and communication components, and barriers/facilitators to participating in CIPC. Findings will help provide guidance around the integration of audiologists and speech-language pathologists into CIPC teams.

Topic for:

  • Audiology
  • Speech-Language Pathology

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4) 
  • School-aged (5-17) 
  • Adult (18-64) 
  • Senior (65+)

Level: Introductory

Simulation as a Method for Developing Essential Competencies in Speech-Language Pathology

Learning in simulated environments is an emerging tool for the development of clinical skills in many health-related programs. The goal of this project was to measure the effect of simulated learning on the development of essential competencies in speech-language pathology. Two standardized simulations were created that targeted the development of skills in the following roles: Expert, Communicator, Collaborator, Advocate and Professional. An eight-item self-assessment tool was created to obtain participants’ perceptions regarding the development of these skills. Preliminary results show that participating in simulations significantly impacted students’ confidence levels in all roles.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology

Age Group:

  • Adult (18-64)

Level: Introductory

S-LP Perspectives on Bilingual Language and Literacy Assessment Practices

This qualitative study used semi-structured interviews to explore the perspectives of 20 Canadian S-LPs on language and literacy assessment with school-aged bilinguals. Reflexive thematic was conducted to generate themes. Results indicate that clinicians’ decision-making processes are constrained by their workplace, and public and private S-LPs use standardized assessments with bilinguals for different purposes. S-LPs reported being unable to consider alternatives because of habitual practice patterns, time and financial constraints. However, many contended with this issue by supplementing questionable formal test findings with informal measures, reporting caveats with scores, or by employing principles of dynamic assessment in testing.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology 
  • Students

Age Group:

  • School-aged (5-17)

Level: Intermediate

The Early Identification of Children at Risk of Language Impairments Using Parent Questionnaires

The present study aims to develop monitoring standards for preschool children using parent instruments. The objective of this longitudinal study was to determine the relationship between parent-reported information at three years of age and performance on standardized tasks measuring robust predictors of DLD at school age. Twenty-eight monolingual (English) and ten bilingual (English-French) children living in Northeastern Ontario, Canada, were assessed at 36 and 70 months of age. At each assessment, caregivers completed a sociodemographic questionnaire and three standardized screening questionnaires. Concurrently, each participant completed seven standardized assessment tasks measuring known markers of DLD.

Topic for:

  • Speech-Language Pathology

Age Group:

  • Pre-school (0-4)

Level: Intermediate